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Poeciliidae, Synodontis, Rift Valley cichlids..Try some fish that are not fussy of the water conditions like the danios.
 

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you can't just say "cichlids," trackhazard. There are cichlid species that need extremely soft and others that need extremely hard, and everything in between.

sydonitis cats + lake malawi cichlids get a big recommendation from me (I have both), but many have issues with planted tanks and these species. I have no problems with java fern, anubias, and certain stem plants. Mosses and Vals are big no-no's in my experience.
 

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Tanganyikan Cichlids.
I like this suggestion. They aren't as disastrous as the Malawian cichlids with the exception of large ones like Frontosas. Shelldwellers or julidochromis species get my vote.:proud:
macclellan said:
you can't just say "cichlids," trackhazard. There are cichlid species that need extremely soft and others that need extremely hard, and everything in between.
I agree.:proud: Angelfish, discus, apistogrammas and rams fall into the category where cichlids usually need soft water to become accustomed in captivity. Although some captive-bred ones are known to hae adapted to hard waters.

The only plants I would keep in Lake Malawi tanks are obviously Javan fern and Anubias species.
 

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texas

Anyone recommend fish that like hard water? I know cichlids come from hard water and rainbowfish as well. Any other reccomendations are appreciated.

-Charlie
Good old Texas Cichlids! all over down here in the Texas Hill Country, the hardwater capitol of the world.
Mine monster wild caught Texas:

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the suggestions. I had assumed that most (if not all cichlids) were hard water. Good to know there are differences. You learn something new every day.

I'm planning on setting up a 40-55 gallon tank as soon as we get our den redone. Plan t-wise, I'm looking at something not overly planted maybe with a dense grouping of plants somethat off to one side with the rest fairly open. I was looking for fish that will take advantage of the swim space. The water we have in our neighborhood is moderately hard and I am loath to try and mess around with the water chemistry too much through additives so i figured I would keep fish that were comfortable w/ harder water.

I wanted to try rainbowfish and/or cichlids but I have a 10 gallon tank full of red cherry shrimp that I want to move and I don't want them to end up being snacks. I was looking at tetras and danios but I've been reading that hard water really affects their lifespans and I feel weird keeping fish knowing that the conditions will lead to an early demise.

Can anyone tell me how effective peat is to reduce pH and hardness?

Thanks,

Charlie
 

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yep..

Thanks for the suggestions. I had assumed that most (if not all cichlids) were hard water. Good to know there are differences. You learn something new every day.

I'm planning on setting up a 40-55 gallon tank as soon as we get our den redone. Plan t-wise, I'm looking at something not overly planted maybe with a dense grouping of plants somethat off to one side with the rest fairly open. I was looking for fish that will take advantage of the swim space. The water we have in our neighborhood is moderately hard and I am loath to try and mess around with the water chemistry too much through additives so i figured I would keep fish that were comfortable w/ harder water.

I wanted to try rainbowfish and/or cichlids but I have a 10 gallon tank full of red cherry shrimp that I want to move and I don't want them to end up being snacks. I was looking at tetras and danios but I've been reading that hard water really affects their lifespans and I feel weird keeping fish knowing that the conditions will lead to an early demise.

Can anyone tell me how effective peat is to reduce pH and hardness?

Thanks,

Charlie
A big Chunk of drift wood dropped mine fairly well when I used to care :sleep:
Now it's just easier to keep fish that like hard water. Maybe I'm just lazy...
 

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I dunno. I live in Dallas and have pretty hard water. Currently I have 4 clown loaches and a SAE, all of which are very healthy. I've had great luck with glowlight tetras, gold barbs, brilliant and harlequin rasboras. I even had a pair of German blue rams that lived to a ripe age of 2 (about their normal lifespan, from what I understand). They even spawned a couple of times (but always ate the eggs).

So I don't know that I'd worry about water hardness too much. I'm sure there are some fish that will have problems with it, but in my experience they seem to be few and far between.

Tom
 

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I have water that is pretty much as hard as you can get. I have successfully kept platys, tiger barbs, cherrry barbs, zebra danios, whiteclouds, ottocinclusis catfish, guppies, swordtails, gouramis, and gold fish.
 
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