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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 12 Habrosus Corydoras I got this past weekend. A few of them have very short barbels. I'm wondering if given a good diet and good water quality if they will grow back?

There is nothing sharp in the tank, they are kept on smooth pea gravel, which I know isn't the best choice but also not the worst choice for them.

They share the tank with 5 nerite snails, a assassin snail, a cherry shrimp and a sparkling gourami
 

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I have 12 Habrosus Corydoras I got this past weekend. A few of them have very short barbels. I'm wondering if given a good diet and good water quality if they will grow back?

There is nothing sharp in the tank, they are kept on smooth pea gravel, which I know isn't the best choice but also not the worst choice for them.

They share the tank with 5 nerite snails, a assassin snail, a cherry shrimp and a sparkling gourami
Are you sure their barbels aren't intact? Habrosus don't have long-ish barbels compared to larger varieties of cories.
 

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Their barbels can grow back, but it takes a long time. Just keep the water quality healthy.

Do the barbels look infected/still eroding? Or do they look healed over and no longer actively infected/eroding?
If still infected, still keep the water quality healthy, but I would recommend using a gentle med such as Melafix or Kordon Rid Fungus/Ich Attack to fight the infection and have it heal faster (won't regrow it faster, just heal/close the wound).

As long as it's not actively infected, it's no big deal, just keep the water clean. Sure a high quality diet might help. I've gotten Corys with fully eroded barbels, even some with just nubs remaining, and they all still thrive, so the barbels aren't that crucial, even if they are living on sand or gravel/pebbles. Don't worry much about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not sure what you mean by healed. They're not red does that mean it's not infected?

So it's for sure they will grow back? Or did you mean you've had ones where they never grew back?
 

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By healed, I mean just the wound closing over so raw "flesh" ins't exposed. Basically skin will form over the wound/damaged barbel end, closing it off so it's not exposed flesh that would be vulnerable to infections. The damaged end will heal over, and the actual barbel will grow back slowly.

Infected barbels can be red or have odd growths (think of fin rot, but on the barbels instead) on the eroded ends or even a whiteish color (different than normal body color) indicating a bacterial infection. Infected barbels will continue to erode/deteriorate and can even rot flesh off the fish's face and kill the fish if the infection isn't treated/stopped. Just keep the water healthy and the substrate decently clean and you should have no issues. If there is still a present infection use one of the gentle meds I mentioned above. The meds will cure the infection, and by help healing, I mean help the fish grow the skin over the eroded barbel quicker, it won't regrow the actual barbel any quicker.

They do grow back, but it is an extremely slow process. Can take many months to over a year for any real noticeable amount to regenerate. Only Corydoras species I really noted on their barbel regrowth were on larger Corys, can't say I've looked at little Corydoras habrosus barbels much. So I don't know if their relatively short (in comparison) barbels would regrow "faster" (since they are shorter overall length) or grow at the same rate as larger corys.
But like I said, it's not too big of a deal. It can look unappealing, but the corys will do fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They do appear healed. I see no red.

They also seem to eat alright and act like a typical cory from my experience. They are not shy and rather active. Breaking off into a few shoals.

I'm trying to make sure they are happy and healthy. I really enjoy this tank. It's my first planed tank and I've spent so much time and money and these little guys seem like the perfect fish for it. I appreciate the help and if anybody has anything else to add I am all ears. Any info I'm game. I love learning about this stuff.
 

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I have a cory that bloodied its barbel on some sharp gravel and wore it off.
I put it into a bare bottom tank. took about two months to heal.
Was quite a hard time for the fish, as it seems to use the barbels to stay upright on the floor.
It was permanently keeled over to one side and had a hard time getting to food fast enough.
All is better now. :) Never medicated, just kept the water clean, and kept it away from abrasive surfaces.

You could always add some rooibos if you don't mind a little peachy copper tint to your water.
I am currently treating a sick female betta with dropsy and fin rot after she got an infection at the sight of a scale injury.
Yep stuff span out of control way too fast. I have tried everything. Methylene baths would clear the wounds, but they would be back the next morning.
Coloidal silver reduced infections but by night 5 of the treatment the infected sites were white again... it does say one may need a second course but she was developing issues with her swim bladder, and I wasn't going to chance a second round, bettas and cories are known to be sensitive. SO now we are back to Epsom baths and I added 4 bags of rooibos tea to her tank. The scale wound is gone and new scale grown back, fin seems to be growing back and there is only a few white filaments left around the fin. I might add another two bags. She seems to like it and hangs out on the side of the tank between the bags. It is really a great plant. It is antibacterial, anti-carcinogen, soothing. Heck, you can use it to treat sunburn. South African babies are raised on the stuff as it prevents colic. Over there you'd probably have to get it from a health food place. Just make sure it is plain organic rooibos (red bush).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everybody.

They seem to still be doing well, despite doing double doses of seed I am still seeing slight traces of nitrite in my water but doing 3 gallon changes daily while adding prime to help.
 
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