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Hey everyone,

I lurk here often, but rarely post/comment, but haven't really seen much on H202.

So with that being said, i had increased my 29g tanks lighting to 96w(4x24w CFL's) and started to deal with some major hair algae, and all my plants, sand and glass had started growing algae like no other.

I started researching H202 for using in an aquaponics system and wanted to figure out the effects it has on fish. I know H202 is often dosed in hydroponic systems to help prevent root rot(my main reason for my urban window aquaponic system) and also algae.

After reading some scientific papers, i decided to dose my main 29g tank with a 1ml per gallon and start experimenting. The glass i had left for 1 month before i started dosing and pretty much just did only 25% water change in that timeframe. After the tank had a nice build up, i did a 50% change and upon refilling, i added the H202.

I noticed some bubbles formed throughout the thank on plants, filter intake, and decor, but the fish seemed to be unaffected and plants seemed fine. I have continued dosing H202 within my system and have seen a fully reverse in algae growth.

I am currently adding 1.5ml of h2o2 every day and have seen my plants actually are showing some nice recovery.

Unfortunately i do not have any photos of my tank from when i started, but i shall be uploading some photos of my tank as it stands right now.

So i was wondering why we aren't talking about h2o2 as a cure to algae? has no one really experimented with it?
 

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There used to be a lot of experimentation with whole-tank H2O2 treatments. But H2O2 has no special affinity for algae, attacking all organic matter indiscriminately. That includes fish, biofilter, and plants. Though these have various forms and degrees of protection, and it's by that virtue that H2O2 is useful at all. Still, there's not a lot of separation between a dose that provides useful algaecidal effect, and one that overwhelms the protection of things you don't want to harm.

What's worse is that this dosage varies from tank to tank. If others repeated your experiment, some would duplicate your results. Others would find little or nothing happens at all. And others still would see damage to fish and plants. Exactly why H2O2 behaves so unpredictably isn't fully understood.

So H2O2 fell out of favor for whole-tank treatments, continuing to be used mostly for spot treatments and plant dips.

I did eventually revisit it, and figured out that providing massive flow without biofiltration during a limited duration treatment provides a greater effect on algae, with reduced effect on fish (especially the sensitive gills) and biofilter; although the optimal dosage is still rather critical, and in some cases has to be determined experimentally. Furthermore, following that up with an Excel overdose has a synergistic effect on algae. I called this treatment the "One-Two Punch", and it's detailed in the link [Fiftymeatballs] provided.

Of course, you can use the techniques detailed there for improving the efficacy of a H2O2 treatment alone, and skip the Excel. Or use the whole treatment, but scale back doses and treat more frequently. Many variations are possible.

Still, these chemicals do cause some harm where it is not intended. We call a treatment "successful" if it eliminates algae while causing minimal harm to other things, preferably such a small amount it goes completely unnoticed. But that is not the same as zero harm, which would be better still, at least in principle if not always in practice.

So while I experiment with algaecides, encourage others' experiments, and use them when needed, I also suggest minimizing their use. What you've done is a useful experiment, as long as you don't have the idea that you can use this forever and neglect the factors that are causing the algae to grow in the first place. ;)
 
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