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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you wonder why guppies die soon after purchase, my just-completed article explains why. (Article is 39 pages with 97 scientific references.) In a nutshell: the main problem is that most guppy breeders only save progeny from young adult guppies (6-8 months age) before starting a new generation. (Guppies can live 2-5 years.) This common practice selects against genes for disease resistance, longevity, etc. Article has recommendations. Photo shows two of my breeder guppies that made it to 15 months of age. (Two years ago, my Blue Grass guppies were dying of "what-not" at 5-8 months.)

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And here Ive been feeling like a terrible fish parent when I cant keep a simple guppy alive for a year but the rasboras live until they are hump backed old ladies :LOL:

Thank you for posting! I have been really enjoying your articles since discovering your website!
 

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"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us." Gandalf: Lord of the Rings
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I read the article, very helpful. I am looking to buy a rare guppy strain in the near future, and I would like to know what guppy strain in your opinion is the most healthy. I would be buying online so aquabid or e bay. So far I have kept regular fancy guppies and they have lived for about 7-8 months in my tanks.
 

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@ichthyogeek this article may be of interest to you in your shrimp breeding project. Sure, it's about guppies and longevity, but a lot of the principles would apply to breeding shrimp lines that are less fragile. Could be good food for thought.
This is pretty good! I'll look into it! Unsure how it would work since shrimp reportedly only live 12-18 months though....unless I want to just have rows upon rows upon rows of shrimp...
 

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This is pretty good! I'll look into it! Unsure how it would work since shrimp reportedly only live 12-18 months though....unless I want to just have rows upon rows upon rows of shrimp...
Well, I would think about the principles at play and not the specifics about longevity in guppy breeding. Both shrimp and guppies have been breed for a specific appearance with a large proportion of the market being bred at huge farms in Asia. Some shrimp lines definitely seem to have hardiness issues, which may be driven by the same issues of inbreeding and selection criteria that does not foster adaptability in the population as a whole. Some of the remedies will be more applicable to shrimp than others, but there are some interesting ideas to consider.

But also breeding is a numbers game and, all things being equal, large populations are going to produce better results than small ones.
 

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And here Ive been feeling like a terrible fish parent when I cant keep a simple guppy alive for a year but the rasboras live until they are hump backed old ladies :LOL:
Same here - just couldn't keep guppies alive but my rasboras and cories flourish and my oldest otto is around 7 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I read the article, very helpful. I am looking to buy a rare guppy strain in the near future, and I would like to know what guppy strain in your opinion is the most healthy. I would be buying online so aquabid or e bay. So far I have kept regular fancy guppies and they have lived for about 7-8 months in my tanks.
Other than the two swordtail strains I purchased and wrote about in the article, I have no idea what delta guppy strains are long-lived. I contacted IFGA and asked for information on this and got no response.
 
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