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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as I have been looking for a schooling fish for my 48 gallon aquarium. I am loving the green neon tetra, however it seems like they have different morphs. Some of them do not have any red on them and other have a lot. I prefer the ones with less blue.

In fact I would rather get blue neon rasboras, but nobody seems to know anything about them.

If you all can give me a suggestion on another schooling fish that would look good next to them I would love to hear suggestions. Right now I like chili rasboras, but I am going to have a red plant background, so I do not know if they would look good against that.

Thanks!
 

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I've never heard of different morphs of Green Neon Tetra's. They are wild caught so there may be contaminants, if that's what you mean.

You're looking for a fish to go with the GNT? I'd stick with something from South America. Ember Tetra's a bright red and very nice, but you said you don't want red. Gold Tetras are unique, and they aren't often incorporated into tanks. I bet with a red plant background, they'd pop. Otherwise, you could do pencils which are more calm.
 

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I've kept Green Neons with regular Neons, I don't recall any 'morph' that had much red in this fish, it's pretty much mostly green with a slight flush of red in the area from the body cavity backwards, it's pretty subtle at best.

I always recommend Tet von Rios, or Flame tetras. Thet are active, hardy and they color up so well once acclimated, with their red shading being part of a lot of other shades and refractive colors. A very under-rated fish, IMO.

 

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I have a small shoal of Kubotai Rasboras in my tank. Full size is around 1 inch. They are very lively and curious.


 

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Thank you guys!

Do you think two schools look good together? Or would one big school of GNT look better?
Probably the GNT would group tighter, but keeping SA Tetra tanks for a while I've seen unrelated species mix in a sort of less organized, mid level grouping. GNT and Flame Tetras will keep to about the same level, but you can't call it a school.
 

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Do you want to keep it a small animal? Any pics/dimensions/info on your tank?

I think a huge school of GNT would be cool, but it's up to you. Red and Blue Colombian Tetras are awesome, though they get a bit bigger than the average schooling tetra. They swim in the upper column, so they'd occupy a niche in the aquarium that isn't usually filled. They are grayish with a blue tinge in the upper parts of their body, and their fins are bright red when they are in an established tank.

Rummynose are amazing schoolers as well. They stay remarkably close to one another, but like to hide in plants and stay low. You could combine them with the GNT, who are more all over the place.

There are also tons of micro-rasboras that come in all sorts of colors. Chilis are one, the 'M. kubotai' above are another. They have good colors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a 90P ADA, so a very boxy 48 gallon aquarium. It has driftwood, and very heavily planted in the background, with some light middle ground planting and a lot of rocks.

So now I am split. I think 20 GNT and 20 gold tetras would look really good. However, on a very different note I love glass catfish. So maybe an even bigger school of GNT like 25-30 and a small school of 8-10 Glass catfish?

For bottom dwellers I am thinking red lizard catfish L010a and a royal farlowella. Maybe a pair of badis badis or dario dario. These stocks check out on aqadvisor.
 

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I'd avoid Badis species, as they are timid and probably prefer their own areas. I *love* how L010a's look, but Royal farlowella's might be too big.

Go with your gut. If your background is black and if you have a nice light, the Gold Tetras will be amazing, imo.
 

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You do understand that the 'gold tetra' Rachoviscus crassiceps's, gold color is part of a suspected organism that is buried in the scales, and tank raised ones are just a plain silvery fish?

The Yellow tetra
Hyphessobrycon bifasciatus, has a truer gold overcast, but not really common in the SA fish trade right now. Used to be fairly popular years back.


 

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You do understand that the 'gold tetra' Rachoviscus crassiceps's, gold color is part of a suspected organism that is buried in the scales, and tank raised ones are just a plain silvery fish?

The Yellow tetra
Hyphessobrycon bifasciatus, has a truer gold overcast, but not really common in the SA fish trade right now. Used to be fairly popular years back.


I am not referring to that species, and in fact I hadn't heard of it until now. True "Gold Tetra" Hemigrammus rodwayi is a gold color, although it'll appear silver in certain lights. It is a wild type fish, at least at my LFS they are. No idea if they are captive-bred, but certainly not line bred and certainly not the ugly fish you're referring to. :)
 

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I am not referring to that species, and in fact I hadn't heard of it until now. True "Gold Tetra" Hemigrammus rodwayi is a gold color, although it'll appear silver in certain lights. It is a wild type fish, at least at my LFS they are. No idea if they are captive-bred, but certainly not line bred and certainly not the ugly fish you're referring to. :)


In either case the causation of the gold coloration is a physical response to a trematode that infects the skin/scales. From the notes for Hemigrammus rodwayi in SeriouslyFish..

This species has something of a confused taxonomic past. The standard colour of the fish is a rather dull silvery grey, with a little colour in the fins. However in certain areas in nature, the species is sensitive to a particular type of trematode parasite. This causes a reaction in the skin of the fish, resulting in a spectacular metallic gold colouration formed by deposits of guanin. When initially discovered, these golden fish were mistakenly described as a new species, Hemigrammus armstrongi. This is now considered a junior synonym of H. rodwayi.
Unfortunately, captive bred specimens do not exhibit this colouration, as they are not exposed to the parasite. This is why most of the ‘golden tetras’ seen for sale do not live up to the common name stated on the tank. Infected wild caught fish are available from time to time, and are truly stunning.
Like all Hemigrammus, the taxonomic status of this species is currently Incertae Sedis, meaning uncertain. The genus is currently used as something of a catch-all for over 70 species of small characin. Most experts agree that a full revision is required, with the likely outcome that many species will be placed into new or different genera.
 
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