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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,

I am having an algae issue and need help in identifying it. I am thinking it is a type of string algae. Some of it is is about an inch long which is hard to see. It is growing on the glass as well as my plants which is shorter. May also be in the mix GDA on glass with fuzzy hairs. A way to explain it.

My tank is 48x24x24 with 2 48" BML which are the Dutch Planted. 90* beam angles. On for 7 hours.

Tank has been running for 2 years and swapped out my T5HO's for the LEDs on 2/9/16.

Pressurized CO2 on 1 hour before lights. Plants pearl. Drop checker is lime green. If I increase little more my Rainbow fish go up to the surface.

Flora:

Red Ludwigia
Ludwigia Narrow Leaf
Purple Cabomba
Furcata Cabomba
Lemon Bacopa
H. Augustifolia
Dwarf Sags
Staurogyne Repens
Ozelot Sword
Water Sprite

Dose NPK & CSM+B along with DIY capsules in substrate.

My own modified dosing:

1/2 tsp 1x week KNO3 (plenty)
1/2 tsp 3x week K2SO4
1/4 tsp 3x week KH2PO4
1/4 tsp 3x CSM+B
Large water change done on Monday.

I have good flow around the tank, all plants are swaying along with some surface movement.

Tank has had ups and downs and I am trying to get out of the downward spiral again but having trouble this time finding the balance. I have had the BML's for a couple of months, so not sure if this new lighting is the issue.

I have never had this much of an algae problem before.

Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks
 

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Looks like fuzz algae, though that is more of a descriptions than the actual kind of algae.

http://www.bubblesaquarium.com/images/home mid_photo/Article on Algae/freshwater_algae.htm
Aquaticscape.com

Doesn't look like any fixes are mentioned besides getting algae eaters. If you do end up getting new livestock, make sure to acclimate very gradually because of the transition from normal co2 levels to high co2 concentration. And be cautious if going with inverts, if the water/pH is too acidic, it can disintegrate their exoskeletons.

Maybe you just have too much light for the plant mass you currently have? All that excess is benefiting algae growth?
 

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LED's are surprisingly strong lights. I've read a lot of people having algae issues for the first time with LED's. I suspect the high PAR of LED's. If I had the problem with a nice LED fixture like yours, I would place some wax paper over the lights to subdue and spread the beams. I've read of some people doing that, but I never saw any updates on whether it worked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you

Yeah, I can't have snails as their shells erode. which sucks as I really like them.

I do have some Otto Cats and lost my 3 year old Bristlenose recently.

I have been working on trying to get the plants mass up again but the algae keeps me trimming. Feel like my tank is out of control. :frown2:

I do have the dimmer switch for the fixtures. Maybe I just need to ramp the lights down but not sure how much.

I do also have BBA. But is this green stuff that has me banging my head against a wall.

More photos.
 

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Looks like fuzz algae, though that is more of a descriptions than the actual kind of algae.


Maybe you just have too much light for the plant mass you currently have? All that excess is benefiting algae growth?
I agree. It's just regular green algae. I keep it under control by turning the lights off for several hours during the day. Some days I'll just leave the lights off altogether. In all of my planted tanks this does not affect plants, just the algae.

My advice is to just cut the continuous hours of light during the day into two, shorter periods that equal the time you'd normally keep lights on. Alage -- all algae -- hate that.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone. I really appreciate your help.

With split photoperiods, how does this work with injecting CO2? Does that also have to shut off, then turn back on? Sorry this is something that i have no knowledge of.
 

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I have heard anecdotal reports that a split photoperiod is effective but I have not seen any scientifically-controlled experiments. You can cut down on the light exposure by using floating plants like frogbit and Pistia (if legal). Also, the age of the tank can be an issue. Newer setups are most vulnerable to algae. I found that supplementing glutaraldehyde to be very effective as a spot treatment, especially on wood.

Another idea would be to test your phosphate level. If you are using tap water, you may not need the potassium phosphate supplementation.

I use 60% RO and 40% tap water for my water changes.

Mike
 

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Siamese algae eaters, they will blow your mind, i had really bad BBA covered all my plants, was stringy webs in the water column, on the glass ect.... got 4 of those bad boys and 1 week later bam no algae i added lots of shrimp and some apple snails as well but it really started disappearing when i added the siamese
 
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