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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i know it can raise ph but my question is will it raise it no mater where it is or is there a cap? say ur ph is 7.0 and it raises it to 7.6 ok now lets say ur ph is 7.6 will it just be 7.6 or will it raise it no matter where it is?
i have a nice peace that has been sitting in my turtle tank for like 7 months and i have fish living in there too no problems have came up. i did put it in there before i knew about it doin what it does to ph. but would ike to put it in my new 40 breeder planted goldfish tank. but the questions above are wut i was wondering ty
 

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Your question interested me and did some digging because I have some granite rocks too. Since granite is igneous, I always thought that it didn't have any effect on water chemistry. It seems that granite is highly variable. A section cut out from a piece of granite and another piece cut out of the same piece a little ways away might be chemically very different. It could be the same too. Granite in one area may be very different or the same as granite in another area. Some granite effects pH and KH and some doesn't. I'm not sure about GH changes. I really haven't looked for this. My digging really confused me more than it helped me.:confused:

I'm going to get some Muriatic Acid from Lowe's and test my granite.

While I can't answer your question, I found a few interesting threads which are below. Maybe chemists and/or meteorologists will help you.

http://www.aquaticquotient.com/forum/showthread.php?t=58850
http://www.planetcatfish.com/shanesworld/shanesworld.php?article_id=332
http://aquaticconcepts.thekrib.com/ : " Water Chemistry" Copyright 2000 by George and Karla Booth
http://www.thekrib.com/Chemistry/
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
very cool i will check it out. i have looked and googled but like u nothing really answered my question. i even read that some can be radioactive but no more than normal things around the house. i tested with white vinegar several rocks actually most fizzed the granite did but very little. ty for replys
 

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very cool i will check it out. i have looked and googled but like u nothing really answered my question. i even read that some can be radioactive but no more than normal things around the house. i tested with white vinegar several rocks actually most fizzed the granite did but very little. ty for replys
I read about the radioactive granite too. It is mostly used in those high dollar table tops and counter tops. :icon_lol:

I studied buffers many years ago and I have forgotten most of it. I think that the answer to you question is this. If the granite sizzles a bit when acid is added, it does have a level where the pH climbs up to when in water and basically buffers the water to that pH/KH level just like you mentioned. (I cut to the chase and omitted a few steps in the explanation.) Exactly what the stopping point is, I have no idea. Your findings of 7.6 sounds logical for your granite and water, but granite can be variable too like is mentioned above. My granite may have a different buffering capacity than yours.

The following link is the best buffer article that I have seen. There is a lot of info in it.
http://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/howtosolveit/Equilibrium/Buffers.htm
 

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hi thought i would chime in since it is a rock question and i am a geologist.

any ways for the most part 99% granites are essential inert and pose no harm to your fish or water chemistry. as for the granites that do pose a threat they are few and far between. Most of there rocks wont be available through the normal channels since they will contain heavy metals and such that are possionus to plants so landscapers wont use them. and landscapers and counter top makers are the primary driving force for what granites are sold at stores not aquarium scapers.

as for your own rock i would use it but don't blame me if some thing happens since i cant see touch or taste your rock.

if you would like take a photo and PM me and i will do my best determine which granite it is, a locality would help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hi thought i would chime in since it is a rock question and i am a geologist.

any ways for the most part 99% granites are essential inert and pose no harm to your fish or water chemistry. as for the granites that do pose a threat they are few and far between. Most of there rocks wont be available through the normal channels since they will contain heavy metals and such that are possionus to plants so landscapers wont use them. and landscapers and counter top makers are the primary driving force for what granites are sold at stores not aquarium scapers.

as for your own rock i would use it but don't blame me if some thing happens since i cant see touch or taste your rock.

if you would like take a photo and PM me and i will do my best determine which granite it is, a locality would help.
very cool and its been in a tank for a while i do believe its ok i had a few fish in the take with my turtles and no problems. thanks for ur offers

left c thanks for the post i thinkin im commin to the conclusion of treat each peice different test it then maybe out it in a icechest with water let sit for a couple days then test know ur starting ph and kh and look at ur end result and there ya go. because i think given what metageologist said and wut i have read from ur links i dont think there is a general answer here. thanks again everyone for all ur replys and help
 

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Thank you very much, metageologist, for responding.

Reading on the internet sure confused me. One article said that granite is useful because its breakdown causes the soil to be alkaline and helps with good plant growth.

This thread from AquaticQuotient.com starts off saying that basically all of these responders know that granite is alkaline. There were several such articles with the basic premise that granite increased alkalinity. On the other hand, there were many articles saying the opposite. They supported my opening statement: "Since granite is igneous, I always thought that it didn't have any effect on water chemistry." The part about heavy metals didn't cross my mind though.

I picked up some Muriatic Acid a little while ago and I'm going to pour some on a few of my granite rocks and see what happens.

This is interesting. My granite rocks are combinations of dark gray areas and white areas that are mottled in appearance. These rocks also have some white stripes in them. The white stripes fizzed when I poured Muriatic Acid on them. As an estimate, these white stripes make up less than 2% of the whole rock.

There is a gravel road near me. The granite gravel is basically all dark gray and white colors mixed together. I poured my MA in many spots and nothing fizzed.

This was fun. I live near the Uwharrie Mountains.
 

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Glad i could help every one granite can be confusing i have this double diamond diagram that helps me. if any one even needs help feel free to send me a image I'm always up for a challenge
 

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Glad i could help every one granite can be confusing i have this double diamond diagram that helps me. if any one even needs help feel free to send me a image I'm always up for a challenge
That's metageologist.

I see that jkcole ninjad me. :)

I saw your response and typed mine. Then I went out the door and I just got in.

I just bought a digital camera so that I could take some pictures of things just like what happened here.
 
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