The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i bought 2 gouramis in the past, oplaine to be exact, my girlfriend bought me 2 dwarf gourami but in a matter of days, 4 to be exact, they died and i found that they have been pecked to death by the other gourami. Petsmart did tell me that it was ok to keep 4 of these together if you have more than a 20 gallon. are they really that aggressive? the sign said they were peaceful... i want to get a few more but after that incident i'm not so sure anymore...i've been keeping my eye on some rainbowfish but fear that they too may be aggressive.
 

·
Children Boogie
Joined
·
16,743 Posts
yes, they are aggressive. Sorry you had to find out the hard way. The dwarf gouramis are usually not aggressive but the opalines are.

Usually you don't mix gouramis. And it's best just to have a male and a female of the same species.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
funny you mentioned that, it's rather unfortunate but the sales rep did tell me that they only sell male gourami, but right when i was talking to the cashier they told me that they only sold females. strange lol. is there a way to find out which sex is which?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Gouramis in the "Opaline" family (Trichogaster) which includes, blues, spoted, "platinum" gouramis, etc. are very apt to be aggressive among themselves and other gourami species, as well. I've kept a lot of gouramis together and I've had serious issues with one of the Trichogasters becoming extremely aggressive with all of the other gouramis in the tank, even harrassing them (Dwarf Gouramis and Sunset Gouramis) to the point where they starve to death. The only gourami that seems to be able to stand up to an aggressive male Trichogaster is the Leeri (Pearl) Gourami, at least, among those that I've kept with them. to sex the Trichogasters, the males have a longer, more pointier dorsal fin...the female's is rounder at the end. Also, the females have a deeper body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
I've never seen a store that sold only one sex or the other of gourami. They're generally in a mixed group and I have yet to meet anyone working in a fish store that could even tell the difference.

I learned about gourami aggression the hard way too. I went to the LFS intending to get a pair of opaline gouramis, but they did not have any females in the tank. So I picked out a nice male, and then I saw a beautiful gold gourami and decided to get him too. The gold gourami was a little bigger than the opaline, and picked on his smaller friend nonstop. The opaline never came out of hiding. The gold also killed a bunch of guppies and a cory and my rainbowfish were all threatening to jump out of the tank and dry out on the carpet if I didn't get rid of him...so I had to give him to the LFS.

Don't trust what you are told at Petsmart most of the time. Their fish staff are often people who don't know what they are doing, and the information that they receive in training is often outdated or just plain wrong. To keep four gouramis you should have much more than 20 gallons, because of their aggression and because some species do get very large. (My male opaline is about 4 1/2 inches long and not full grown)

With gouramis it is safest to keep a single one or a male/female pair of the same species.

What rainbows are you looking at? They're very active and can get aggressive, but I haven't found them to be too bad. They're nippy but they don't seem to attack one fish until they hurt or kill it like gouramis will. What other fish are you thinking about putting them in with? What size tank?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top