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i recently bought this oxygen tank off my cousin, and i was wondering if any members had any thoughts on where to go from here.

i called around my city (San Antonio) to see if i could turn this tank into a co2 tank and they said i could and gave me a few breakdowns on cost.

info: tank cost $75.00
testing cost $20.00 (apparently every 5 years this need to be done)
refitting cost $35.00 (to put a new valve or something)
refilling cost $40.00 (co2)

I've been reading around the forums for a while and i've been under the assumption regulators fit any sized tank... this is my first post so if i've said anything stupid let me know!

thanks in advaance
 

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Yah you will need one of those tall two wheel carts that you see people stack boxes on. i think it's called a dolly?

 

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Seriously, any tank of pressurized gas can be dangerous, but short tanks like 5-20 pounders are pretty stable and unlikely to topple over. That isn't true for that tank. It isn't very stable on its base, so it has to be attached to a wall or some other strong vertical surface to prevent anything from toppling it. Knock the valve off the top and it can be driven through several walls by the escaping CO2. Also, transporting it to be filled and back to your place is a major problem. I think you need a truck, equipped with a lift gate and a rack made for securing pressurized gas tanks. Then the truck needs to be clearly identified as hauling pressurized gases. It's hard to see this being a bargain.
 

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Seriously, any tank of pressurized gas can be dangerous, but short tanks like 5-20 pounders are pretty stable and unlikely to topple over. That isn't true for that tank. It isn't very stable on its base, so it has to be attached to a wall or some other strong vertical surface to prevent anything from toppling it. Knock the valve off the top and it can be driven through several walls by the escaping CO2. Also, transporting it to be filled and back to your place is a major problem. I think you need a truck, equipped with a lift gate and a rack made for securing pressurized gas tanks. Then the truck needs to be clearly identified as hauling pressurized gases. It's hard to see this being a bargain.
You placard only if it is more than 1000 pounds. To transport it it it needs to have the threaded metal cap on. It also needs to be strapped down. Never transport it with the regulator attached.
 

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Seriously, any tank of pressurized gas can be dangerous, but short tanks like 5-20 pounders are pretty stable and unlikely to topple over. That isn't true for that tank. It isn't very stable on its base, so it has to be attached to a wall or some other strong vertical surface to prevent anything from toppling it. Knock the valve off the top and it can be driven through several walls by the escaping CO2. Also, transporting it to be filled and back to your place is a major problem. I think you need a truck, equipped with a lift gate and a rack made for securing pressurized gas tanks. Then the truck needs to be clearly identified as hauling pressurized gases. It's hard to see this being a bargain.
in a shop they usually get chained to the wall or a car lift of something like that. Watch mythbusters and you will soon figure out a tank this big in no joke.
 

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Seriously, any tank of pressurized gas can be dangerous, but short tanks like 5-20 pounders are pretty stable and unlikely to topple over. That isn't true for that tank. It isn't very stable on its base, so it has to be attached to a wall or some other strong vertical surface to prevent anything from toppling it. Knock the valve off the top and it can be driven through several walls by the escaping CO2. Also, transporting it to be filled and back to your place is a major problem. I think you need a truck, equipped with a lift gate and a rack made for securing pressurized gas tanks. Then the truck needs to be clearly identified as hauling pressurized gases. It's hard to see this being a bargain.
I worked part time at a party store when I was in college as a receiving supervisor. the guy that delivered the helium would always bring in a picture or two of cars or buildings that were not protected with the tanks strapped and secured with the metal cap. Let me say, yes, you can launch the tank through the firewall of a car through the engine compartment, and out the grill of the car.
 
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