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Hoping for a little custom advice from the people here with far more knowledge than I. This is my first high tech tank.. I'm 2 years in.. been an up and down adventure with a few big fails and lot of good successes. I've managed many of my goals, carpeting plants, some pearling, explosive growth. The last 6 months or so I have finally gotten algae to what I would term "under control" but still not where I feel it should be. I have to scrape the glass every 2 or 3 days and bleach the rocks every couple months. I was looking for some advice on how I can get to where it is really just small routine glass cleanings. I've attached pics from some different angles below but here is all my basics.

17 gallons UNS 60P, Eheim 2211(24/7), injected CO2 6 hours per day, Beamswork light with dimmer.. at about 70% 5.5 hours a day and I dose with NA Thrive shrimp specific 2x a week at a dose of 2ml. It is fairly heavily planted(anubias, rotala, MC, and lots of lots of crypts). I have an army of assorted cherry and crystal shrimp(they have been crossbreeding for a dozen plus generations now) and tetras.

Water parameters.. pH 7.8 pre CO2.. 7.0 post CO2, ammonia 0, phosphates 0, gh 20, kh 14). Drop checker stays a consistent lime green.

I have read lots about algae and done a fair amount of experimenting. But as we all know it is super frustrating when the answer can always be too much or too little of multiple things. So what would folks suggest I try next? More or less light? More or less ferts? Is it time for one of the UV algae things that I always see advertised?

Thanks for the time and thoughts!

Chris
 

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29g rimless cherry shrimp, 20g cube dwarf cichlid, 2 x 40g breeder community fish
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17 gallons UNS 60P, Eheim 2211(24/7), injected CO2 6 hours per day, Beamswork light with dimmer.. at about 70% 5.5 hours a day and I dose with NA Thrive shrimp specific 2x a week at a dose of 2ml. It is fairly heavily planted(anubias, rotala, MC, and lots of lots of crypts). I have an army of assorted cherry and crystal shrimp(they have been crossbreeding for a dozen plus generations now) and tetras.
I think we all struggle with tanks at times. I can have two tanks next to each other with similar setups and one will be doing great and the other just sucks, but...

CO2 - unless you are using a pH controller it should come on an hour before lights on and turn off an hour before lights off. The higher (or more) lights the more CO2 you need. I'm running lights at 9 hours, but at like 40% at their peak. I'm doing light fert dosing with Easy Green and Seachem phosphorous and after months of growth just starting to hit twice a week.

I'm sure those that have better experience than I will be here soon to help too.
 

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You will find all of the information here that you need for combating algae so rather that repeating it I thought that I would add a little humor that contains more than a bit of truth.

At some point in one of the threads here I read something like this...

"There are two kinds of aquarists, those who have algae and those who say that they don't."

It becomes a matter of how much it bothers you and what lengths you will go to to remove it.

Here are some ideas I posted recently...

I would say that algal growth is produced by a combination of factors and that focusing on just one can be misleading. You need to experiment to find a balance and then be consistent to maintain it.

Here are the factors that I have found need to be addressed:
1. Overfeeding. Big issue.
2. Too much light. You need just enough but not more. Enough will be determined by the type of plants that you have.
3. Fertilization. You need just enough. Start lightly and then adjust as you observe your plants response. Doing it daily is better than periodically so an autodoser is useful.
4. Good, even, adequate flow throughout the tank. A circular pattern works well. Think gentle swaying of plants but not pinning fish against the glass;)
5. Regular(1-2 weeks) large water changes with removal of detritus/mulm when possible.
6. Having some fast growing stems and or some immersed house plants as nitrate sponges.
7. Not overstocking with fish. The old 1 inch of fish inch per gallon rule is probably way too much for a planted tank, especially if you are lightly planted,
8. Plant heavily to start and add fish slowly.
9. CO2 is your friend.
10. Every tank is different. One size (plan) does not fit all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You will find all of the information here that you need for combating algae so rather that repeating it I thought that I would add a little humor that contains more than a bit of truth.

At some point in one of the threads here I read something like this...

"There are two kinds of aquarists, those who have algae and those who say that they don't."

It becomes a matter of how much it bothers you and what lengths you will go to to remove it.
Good stuff right there... thank you!

And thanks for taking the time to type out some more tips as well. Nothing I haven't read before, but I guess I just need to keep tweaking and experimenting.

Thanks!
 

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Hoping for a little custom advice from the people here with far more knowledge than I. This is my first high tech tank.. I'm 2 years in.. been an up and down adventure with a few big fails and lot of good successes. I've managed many of my goals, carpeting plants, some pearling, explosive growth. The last 6 months or so I have finally gotten algae to what I would term "under control" but still not where I feel it should be. I have to scrape the glass every 2 or 3 days and bleach the rocks every couple months. I was looking for some advice on how I can get to where it is really just small routine glass cleanings. I've attached pics from some different angles below but here is all my basics.

17 gallons UNS 60P, Eheim 2211(24/7), injected CO2 6 hours per day, Beamswork light with dimmer.. at about 70% 5.5 hours a day and I dose with NA Thrive shrimp specific 2x a week at a dose of 2ml. It is fairly heavily planted(anubias, rotala, MC, and lots of lots of crypts). I have an army of assorted cherry and crystal shrimp(they have been crossbreeding for a dozen plus generations now) and tetras.

Water parameters.. pH 7.8 pre CO2.. 7.0 post CO2, ammonia 0, phosphates 0, gh 20, kh 14). Drop checker stays a consistent lime green.

I have read lots about algae and done a fair amount of experimenting. But as we all know it is super frustrating when the answer can always be too much or too little of multiple things. So what would folks suggest I try next? More or less light? More or less ferts? Is it time for one of the UV algae things that I always see advertised?

Thanks for the time and thoughts!

Chris
Was doing some research on algae and found a couple of contradictory statements about parameters/light. I took three things away from all that I've read and watched.

1) Overall stability and consistency are key. Plants like consistency and will be better able to defend themselves when in good growing conditions. Don't chase parameters/lights/ferts or make sudden changes.
2) Lightly cleaning the substrate with every water change gets rid of a ton of detritus that algae will feast on
3) Plant husbandry is key. Trimming the old growth that may be more vulnerable to algae allows the plant to focus on new growth. Trim and replant as often as the species allows.

Would love to hear what others have to say. I was just going a little nuts hearing two different respected sources tell me opposite things.
 

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Waterbox Frag 105.4 High Tech
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You will find all of the information here that you need for combating algae so rather that repeating it I thought that I would add a little humor that contains more than a bit of truth.

At some point in one of the threads here I read something like this...

"There are two kinds of aquarists, those who have algae and those who say that they don't."

It becomes a matter of how much it bothers you and what lengths you will go to to remove it.

Here are some ideas I posted recently...

I would say that algal growth is produced by a combination of factors and that focusing on just one can be misleading. You need to experiment to find a balance and then be consistent to maintain it.

Here are the factors that I have found need to be addressed:
1. Overfeeding. Big issue.
2. Too much light. You need just enough but not more. Enough will be determined by the type of plants that you have.
3. Fertilization. You need just enough. Start lightly and then adjust as you observe your plants response. Doing it daily is better than periodically so an autodoser is useful.
4. Good, even, adequate flow throughout the tank. A circular pattern works well. Think gentle swaying of plants but not pinning fish against the glass;)
5. Regular(1-2 weeks) large water changes with removal of detritus/mulm when possible.
6. Having some fast growing stems and or some immersed house plants as nitrate sponges.
7. Not overstocking with fish. The old 1 inch of fish inch per gallon rule is probably way too much for a planted tank, especially if you are lightly planted,
8. Plant heavily to start and add fish slowly.
9. CO2 is your friend.
10. Every tank is different. One size (plan) does not fit all.
1000% agree with this post

Minimalist approach is the way to go. Only as much light as you need. Only as much ferts as you need. Excess of anything is bad and algae will take advantage.

I would also add to get RID OF UNHEALTHY PLANTS. Struggling plants lead to decaying matter lead to algae issues.

One said to lower ferts and light and other said don’t change anything and just prune old growth.
This isn't necessarily conflicting advice and I think you should do both. Old growth usually doesn't see light and is usually in pretty rough shape. Every once in a while I think it helps to take the healthy trimmings you have up top and replace the old growth entirely
 

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Cleanliness is key. Religiously remove any dead or dying leaves and keep the substrate surface clean. Regular water changes and clean filters

Dont reduce light or ferts. This almost never fixes anyone's algae issues. The algae showed up for two reasons: dirty conditions and/or unhappy plants. The first one is easy, clean everything up. It can be difficult to thoroughly vacuum the sub with a tank full of shrimp, but if there's crap laying around, figurative and literal crap, you're gonna have to remove it

Then you want the plants happy and surging with growth. Healthy plants dont get algae, a healthy leaf doesnt get it...at least in the beginning before it turns epidemic. So once everything is clean you want to make sure you have adequate CO2, adequate ferts (too little is a bigger problem than too much) and good light. Dont make it a fight against algae. Give the plants what they need to get happier and keep everything real clean
 

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Regarding detritus and tank hygiene. On water change day I use my Python to hoover up the "beach" in the front of my tank. That is where I feed and and most uneaten food will accumulate. My shrimp and Cories also do a good job with that. For the back of my tank which is a Crypt jungle, and largely inaccessible, the mulm can be stirred up with a turkey baster. The following day I clean the prefilter on my Oase Biomaster. That gives the filter a chance to trap the newly released detritus from the day before.
 
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