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Discussion Starter #1
I've been out of the hobby for some time, and just siliconed my first diy nano last night.. I've redone the silicone on tanks before using this stuff, but that was years ago...

I was just reading through the fine print on the label looking for curing times and noticed that it says it's not for use below waterlines or aquariums.

That's news to me. Am I hosed? Do I need to pull all the silicone and start over or is this just GE covering their butts?
 

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So long as it is 100% silicone and not treated with any additives, it should be fine to use.
 

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Silicone I (the blue tube) is safe to use. I think GE puts that warning on the tube as a disclaimer that they are not responsible if anything happens (i.e. a leak in an aquarium that floods your house).

GE silicone II (the red tube, for bathroom tiles) is not safe to use because of the anti-mildew additives.
 

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Silicone I (the blue tube) is safe to use. I think GE puts that warning on the tube as a disclaimer that they are not responsible if anything happens (i.e. a leak in an aquarium that floods your house).

GE silicone II (the red tube, for bathroom tiles) is not safe to use because of the anti-mildew additives.
I agree. I made a tank similar to yours using the same silicone. Just make sure you give it a few days to cure and lose its smell and you should be fine.
 

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This topic has been discussed more times than you can shake a stick at
lol, I second that. Its on every forum I visit and its the number one choice for diy-ers on youtube. I resealed my 55g tank with it last year but that tank is still not up and running due to a change plans. But it does hold the water without problems. I trust that it will be safe for live considering its widely used.
 

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This topic has been discussed more times than you can shake a stick at,
yet it's amazing how often people basically get it wrong. :D

GE offers a range of products targeted at consumer home improvement. Basically, there are two product lines: Silicone I and Silicone II. The only significant difference is that Silicone I is acid cure (it gives off acetic acid as it cures) while Silicone II is ammonia cure (it gives off ammonia as it cures). It's arguable that the cure has no impact on suitability for aquarium use, though typically acid cure silicone is stronger, with the downside that it's slower to cure.

Both Silicone I and Silicone II are available as "window and door" or "kitchen and bath." The difference between these variants is that the kitchen and bath product has a mold inhibitor. It's taken for granted on aquarium forums that the mold inhibitor is harmful, though honestly I don't recall ever seeing anything that proves that.

All of that information would point to Silicone I window and door as the best of these products.

When all is said and done, it's important to note that NONE of these products are "strong" when compared to other varieties of silicone. If you're doing a project where absolute strength is not a requirement it's probably OK and as noted above, GE Silicone I is very commonly used around fish tanks. If you're doing something that requires good strength, you're probably better off looking elsewhere. Momentive RTV108 or GE SCS1200 are common choices for a "better" silicone though they won't be in a generic hardware store. You can get them at places like Grainger, or online at Amazon or mcmaster-carr.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
yet it's amazing how often people basically get it wrong. :D

GE offers a range of products targeted at consumer home improvement. Basically, there are two product lines: Silicone I and Silicone II. The only significant difference is that Silicone I is acid cure (it gives off acetic acid as it cures) while Silicone II is ammonia cure (it gives off ammonia as it cures). It's arguable that the cure has no impact on suitability for aquarium use, though typically acid cure silicone is stronger, with the downside that it's slower to cure.

Both Silicone I and Silicone II are available as "window and door" or "kitchen and bath." The difference between these variants is that the kitchen and bath product has a mold inhibitor. It's taken for granted on aquarium forums that the mold inhibitor is harmful, though honestly I don't recall ever seeing anything that proves that.

All of that information would point to Silicone I window and door as the best of these products.

When all is said and done, it's important to note that NONE of these products are "strong" when compared to other varieties of silicone. If you're doing a project where absolute strength is not a requirement it's probably OK and as noted above, GE Silicone I is very commonly used around fish tanks. If you're doing something that requires good strength, you're probably better off looking elsewhere. Momentive RTV108 or GE SCS1200 are common choices for a "better" silicone though they won't be in a generic hardware store. You can get them at places like Grainger, or online at Amazon or mcmaster-carr.
Thanks All Your Base! Being a small 12x12 cube, I don't know that I'll worry about needing a heavier duty silicone.
 

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I wouldn't say this out loud in certain crowds, but I wouldn't worry about it at that size either, assuming you're using good technique and getting reasonable sized fillets in the corners.
 
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