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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
By your own experience or live encounter, what can you say about this fish?

I came across a batch of the baby fish (3" size) for dirt cheap (US$0.5 each. The seller (a friend) told me they are very hardy and could grow quite big and best suited in a large non community aquascape. They prefer to eat live foods and very easy to keep.

Thought these could be rather cool to have...
 

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Just got rid of mine about 2 weeks ago. It's an awesome predator so make sure that you don't keep it with small fish. I weaned mine over to pellets after about 3 weeks of starvation.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks eric!

That is one of a clear shot to give me an idea of what older C hujeta looks like.

So how do you find it? (I know you might kinda hated it since it was gotten rid of)
The pic was shot on a nice planted tank. So I assume it does not dart around and knock out things or create havoc on a scape due to boredom/habit.
 

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hows it going?


i work with theses gars.... i would recomend a minimum tank since of about 60 gallons , this is because they get to almost a foot long and i can tell you they are rellentless when it comes to rosey red feeders. they are more or less a top swimming so most sa chiclids should do fine.



jordan
 

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It's actually one of those fish that you love and hate at the same time. I love how awesome of a predator it truly is, but I couldn't keep anything that was less than 2" with it. Anything that size and smaller and it became lunch. I used him to get rid of some oversized endler females and he nuked them in about a week's time (16 of them in the tank before he was introduced).

As Jordan say, it really is a top swimming fish and does extremely well in a planted tank. I housed that one in my 90 gallon open top tank without any issues (had some floating plants on the surface). It doesn't disturb anything in the tank at all and is actually a very controlled and deliberate swimmer.

I only got rid of it since I added some sterbai cories to the tank and he was looking at them like they were lunch (which is interesting since he doesn't mind the otos in the tank at all and they're much smaller than any other fish in the tank). The hujeta actually snatch one up when I added the cories to the tank and swam around with it for around 30 seconds before I got him to release the cory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@joejoeg,
Not to worry, I have plenty of space for my next tank.

@Ibn,
Interesting.... they seems, as you observed, ignore very small fish like otto. Could be the same to chinese algae eater or such.

How about any issues with tiny shrimp?
Do the fish picky enough to ignore anything less than bite size?

I wonder if they can be any more interesting if kept in a small shoal...
 

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Sounds funny and cruel at the same time. Something Dr. Hannibal Lector would say if he kept fish. :)
actually Wood, this is not an uncommon practice.
someone starved his fire eel for two months to not
only get him to eat pellets, but to be less nocturnal.
(starved as in; not supply his usual Live food)

I regularly trim the tips on the claws of my crayfish
with a nail clipper, as it keeps him from scratching
other fish he grabs at, and to stunt his growth a bit.

in farming we condition animals all the time to
behave in ways that suit our needs, and many
of those animals wind up on your dinner plate.

keep in mind many fish and vert species are
opportunistic feeders that in the wild may go
days and weeks without food till they finally
stumble on something that can fill them up.
us feeding them every day is what's unnatural.
 

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I think it has to do with the body shape of the fish when it becomes a factor whether it becomes lunch or not for the fish. The other fish in the tank at the time were: otos, gara gara pingi (3" fat submarines), a pair of checkerboard cichlids (2"), and the female endler's livebearers.

Out of that group, the only fish that the hujeta went after were the endler's. It expressed no interest in the checkerboard, which I thought would have become lunch over night. The sterbai cories would probably have been okay too if I had left them alone. The one that the hujeta tagged was on the first night when I added them to the tank. As soon as it hit the water, it got the hujeta's attention and I think that's why it was seen as food (the hujeta begs like an oscar when it sees me I usually drop pellets for it).

As for shrimps, I used some ghost shrimps to test it out and those were left alone. It might have to do with the huge plant mass and their transparent bodies which helped them blend in. Try it yourself with some feeder ghost shrimps and see if they'll survive.

3 weeks of starvation does sound like a long time, but factor in that most predators go without food for most of the time and it just becomes common sense.
 

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actually Wood, this is not an uncommon practice.
someone starved his fire eel for two months to not
only get him to eat pellets, but to be less nocturnal.
(starved as in; not supply his usual Live food)

I regularly trim the tips on the claws of my crayfish
with a nail clipper, as it keeps him from scratching
other fish he grabs at, and to stunt his growth a bit.

in farming we condition animals all the time to
behave in ways that suit our needs, and many
of those animals wind up on your dinner plate.

keep in mind many fish and vert species are
opportunistic feeders that in the wild may go
days and weeks without food till they finally
stumble on something that can fill them up.
us feeding them every day is what's unnatural.
No I completely understand. Like ringing a bell when you feed an animal. It eventually relates the bell to food. A lot of fish will actually respond to me opening the cabinet to get their food, or open the hood especially.

Most of the time when I bring new fish home they will not respond to the zooplankton that I feed because they are so used to the flake food the LFS dumps in. After a week they will give in and start eating the zooplankton and love it.

I just thought that the sentence sounded funny, thats all :)
 
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