The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a flower shrimp about three weeks ago, and I know they are supposed to change colors, but it suddenly went from consistent cream and pale tan to a bright red with brown overnight.

The first few days I was sure it was going to die because it didnt move, feed or do anything, but now it sits by the filter powerhead 24/7, with fans open most of the time. I was worried that it wouldn't get enough to eat with only a 10 gallon (most care sheets I found recommended a 20 gallon or more), so for the past week I have been dropping a tiny bit of sinking fry food (First Bites) into the stream every few days, which it munched up right away.

I am mostly concerned because the color change was so sudden and dramatic. Online info says red or dark is good from some sources, others say it means it is about to die, others say it is a sign of impending molt... Otherwise my shrimp's behavior seems normal based on what I have read, with the active fanning and hanging out in the highest flow areas.

Does anyone have experience with an overnight change like this?
 

·
Premium Member
75g, 40g, 20g
Joined
·
3,848 Posts
When I have picked up flower shrimp from my LFS, they typically are tan/brown. Once they got used to there new tank, they have brightened up to more of a red color.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
From liveaquaria.com's website..

The Singapore Flower Shrimp comes from the fast moving waters of rivers and streams within Asia. They are interesting shrimp that are able to change colors very rapidly. Their coloration will range from tan to dark brown, and at times, even a bright red. The conditions that cause these shrimp to change color are unknown, but it is speculated that either their mood or the need for camouflage are the reasons. They are one of the larger freshwater shrimp attaining a maximum size of 3-1/2 inches. Their front six legs have fan-like appendages in which they use to filter the water for food. They are very interesting shrimp that will add a new dimension to your peaceful freshwater aquarium. An established freshwater aquarium of at least 20 gallons with plenty of hiding places and mature substrate are the ideal setup for the Singapore Flower Shrimp. It should be housed with peaceful fish that will not pose a threat of eating these shrimp.
Differences between the sexes is easily noticeable with the male being larger than the female. They are extremely difficult to breed going through many planktonic stages before reaching miniature adult stage and need brackish to full strength saltwater.
Singapore Flower Shrimp are omnivores that will consume algae, detritus and left over food from both the water column and the substrate. They will vigorously fan the water column during feeding to filter out any food that they can catch. If insufficient food is present, supplement with a quality flake food or pellet.
I'm guessing that they're from fast streams and like having a bit of flowing water to filter feed from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I am starting to suspect either impending molt or illness. It stopped feeding and started roaming the tank today (though it keeps returning to its favorite spot by the powerhead). I keep it with guppies and danios in a heavily planted tank that has several hiding places available for hiding while molting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I love my flower shrimp (I know them as bamboo shrimp), they are super fun to watch and a great, peaceful addition. The do change colour, mine do it when they are just about to molt; they go from tan to a bright orange-red.

It is important to note that crustaceans will stress molt, so that is something to watch for, but typically most crustaceans will eat less or nothing at all a few days before a healthy molt. I leave my molts in the tank for the smaller shrimp to eat; it takes them a couple days and the whole thing is gone.

Bamboo shrimp like fast flowing water and will wander the tank if they cannot find a good spot with a strong current. I got a mini powerhead/filter for my shrimp specifically and they love it - each one has their favourite spot to hang out. I have positioned some mopani drift wood with some prime spots that intersect the current and the shirmp hang out there almost 24 hours a day. The current shoots mid water level along the front of my tank, so the shrimp are nicely displayed all the time. I have heard that they will sometimes climb out of tanks in search of stronger currents.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top