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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question. For those that have floating plants in a larger tank (mine is a 90g), is there no way for them not to be a total PITA? I love what they do for nitrates and I love the look actually + the cover for shrimp etc. I have Frogbit and Dwarf Water Lettuce.

But when changing the water or trimming.. or rearranging plants.. or even when the water level just drops a bit.. just a total PITA. I even have tried using fishing line to keep them where I want them, which helps. But the minute the water level drops some are able to float past it. (I'm sure I could use two lines, one below the other at different levels to try and account for that)

Any tips or tricks before I just get rid of most if not all of them? Are there any larger floating plants I'm not thinking of that may be easier to deal with? I do really like the benefits of how they soak up nutrients and provide cover for the fish, but it just doesn't seem worth it.
 

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Once floaters take over, no matter the size, it'll have this issue, and it also depends on the depth, the deeper it is, the harder, you won't have a mechanism to go down that far, however, you may try. A tube connected by a piece of plastic and then a suction cup, when the water decreases, the tube will drop to that depth, and keep the floaters at bay but you have to manually adjust it sometimes. A separator is always best but even after awhile you may run into issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Once floaters take over, no matter the size, it'll have this issue, and it also depends on the depth, the deeper it is, the harder, you won't have a mechanism to go down that far, however, you may try. A tube connected by a piece of plastic and then a suction cup, when the water decreases, the tube will drop to that depth, and keep the floaters at bay but you have to manually adjust it sometimes. A separator is always best but even after awhile you may run into issues.
Yea that was my fear. I don't really see a way around it. I think I'll just start with reducing the amount instead of getting rid of them all. May try tubing instead, I just wasn't a fan of the tube circle I've seen on youtube and otherwise. Wanted one half of the tank with them and the other without. But may try it, thanks!

Tall plants will hold the roots in place, consecutively the plants.

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It's a 90g tall so most plants just won't reach that high. I've got some jungle val, but it isn't the greatest for that.

Bump: One other question, has anyone ever used the larger pond floating plants in aquariums? Any issues with this? I know they're very invasive, but less likely to be moved around/flipped over as easily.
 

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I have some water hyacinth going in my 150G indoor pond. Seems to be doing pretty well.

The main downside I've found is they tend to shed a lot of root material. It can clog up prefilter and filter sponges pretty fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have some water hyacinth going in my 150G indoor pond. Seems to be doing pretty well.

The main downside I've found is they tend to shed a lot of root material. It can clog up prefilter and filter sponges pretty fast.
Thank you, that's good to know. Really love the look of those but I didn't ever think about that, there's none really with the small floaters I have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually, one last question. Does anyone use stem plants as floaters instead? When starting the tank I used hornwort and a few others that I let initially float but then sank. Thinking I can use them for the same cover/nitrate soaking purposes with less issues. How do people keep them floating?
 
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