The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I'm thinking of adding some floating plants to my 20 gallon long tank. I'd like to get some recommendations and thoughts before I do. My tank is pretty low tech/low light. It's lit by a Finnex Stingray, so I'm not sure if the addition of floating plants would hurt the low light plants I have growing with shade.

I'd like a plant with short roots, since I have a shallower tank, something that would do okay with the lower light, and something that wouldn't take over the whole tank. Thanks for any help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,741 Posts
How high is the light above the substrate? The higher up the weaker it is.
(added) You should know all floaters will eventually take over a tank its just a matter of time and species (on a tank that long it will take months.. except for duckweed). They have access to more co2 which is typically the limiting factor in undrwater plant growth so they will grow faster and potentially fog ferts. That said i keep floaters on most of my low light planted tanks. Periodic thinning is advised.
For floating plants you can try:
Riccia fluitans-no roots its a crystalwort. Can be a little messy at first when its floating free stands but turns into a large mat with time. As it grows it pushes older grown downward. Easy to thin by hand. This is one in a 11.8" cube.. its grown since I took the photo.


And in a 5.5g on my husband's desk-it shades marimo so I can use a stronger light on the tank without issues underside looks a bit messier as it was moved recently, this is over 4 months of growth to get the riccia mass that thick/pushed down under water.




Duckweed-most people don't like this as its had to get rid of once in the tank, a tiny portion of a leaf will turn into multiples within days, easily sticks to plants at the surface, hardscape protruding from the tank, filter plumbing, and heater cords. It does not do well with HOB filters as it will get pushed under by the outflow then sucked onto the intake and clog the filter. On the plus side it has very short roots. (duckweed photo is not mine)





Salvinia minima- easier to remove from a tank than duckweed but larger roots (though in my experience they don't get past 1-1.5" long). Has a cool cat tongue like texture on the top of the leaves. Its very retaliate and tolerates high light and condensation dripping on it (unlike frogbit). I use this on most of my betta tanks.
showing roots-6g bowfront with salvinia, I made a barrier under the lid to keep the floaters where I want since there is a monitor above blocking light on part of the tank.

above views


same cube as riccia photo, a year earlier


If you want short roots don't get frogbit or (dwarf) water lettuce, they get monster roots with time. I have frogbit in a 2.5g vase that's about 10" full of water, roots are hitting the substrate.


Check your state's illegal/invasive plant list before buying.
There are a few variations of the above mentioned plants including dwarf riccia, giant duckweed, and salvinia molesta.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,741 Posts
With tank lights on I took some more shots
Riccia underside view in cube (clean riccia growth)


Giant duckweed with riccia (for me giant duckweed does not grow as prolifically as regular duckweed).


Salvinia minimia on another tank, light was removed to take photo
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top