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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had duckweed in my tank before, and I hated it so much! Took me a month to get rid of those stupid floating leaves... Anyways, I'm thinking about trying floaters again, such as frogbit or dwarf water lettuce, to give some extra cover for my CPDs and help diffuse the light. I do not like big roots hanging down, though, so I'm not sure what plant would be the best choice. And I'm not sure if it is even worth it... anyone want to share their experience, positive or negative, with floaters? Is it a good idea?
 

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I despise duckweed as well. I've had battles of getting it out of tanks before, and as you know, it's not fun. Might be cleaning out another tank I have tomorrow of duckweed... should be fun :bounce:

I haven't tried frogbit or dwarf water lettuce, but I have mainly salvinia. I like the stuff, and it's got bigger leaves than duckweed so it's easier to get out of the tank if need be. The roots aren't long either, at least I don't think they are long.
 

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I like frogbit as a floater and the roots are generally 2-3" long on mine. It is pretty easy to keep under control because it is larger. Although it does not like surface disturbance much at all. I also use brazilian pennywort as a floater, but the roots are a little longer than the frogbit's roots. It is still easy to manage since it is a stem plant, and the leaves look like small lily pads. The fine roots cluster pretty well and provide decent cover. If you can't find a good picture of the pennywort as a floater I can post a picture.
 

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I grow dwarf water lettuce, frogbit, hygroryza aristata, and giant duckweed. The first three grow nice roots which are great for sheltering shy fish and growing biofilm for shrimp to graze on. They are also easy to remove from the tank. Giant duckweed is better than the regular variety since it grows much larger (about the size of a dime) and the bottom turns a nice maroon color when given plenty of light. It's also easily removed. Be sure to check your state's regulations before you try to get some.
 

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I keep frogbit, DWL, salvinia, and RRF. I like them all, though I may remove them from my high light tank because of the high flow.

If you're looking for good cover without extensive roots, salvinia would probably be best. RRF generally stays manageable, but when undisturbed can grow long red roots.

Duckweed is aquatic herpes.

Azolla is another to avoid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, you all have talked me into it. I'm giving frogbit a try. How quickly does it reproduce? Is it better to have a few clumps here and there, or a full cover?
 

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Start with a few clumps. Frogbit reproduces steadily. However, if you have lots of nutrients in the water column and give it plenty of light, it will explode in growth. Floaters, with the exception of hygroryza, don't do well with surface current.
 

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To me the specking in terms of the Aquascape, Water Lettuce is all about the roots. In a healthily medium light tank the leaf crow will max out around 3" across and roots can get 6" long.

To the best of my knowledge there is no "Dwarf" water lettuce variety. There are smaller Water lettuce plants that are stunted by lack of light and nutrients. But , will grow to have 10+ crowns with 16"+ black roots if placed outside in a pond.



In July of 2011 I bought a single Watter Lettuce plant from Garden Center that sells pond plants. after one year I had consevartively filled this sized container maybe 20Xs having several tanks going. At he time of that pic 9/2012. I had is covering my Whiskey barrel pond, 2- 40B, 10, 4g, 2-20Ls and there were 3 of those containers filled. The pic was one container I was selling at a swap for $8.

I sold off or composted all but 2 small dime sized plants by mid Oct. My 10gl(low light) is currently covered.

I like it as a Nutrient Mop and a way to control light, shrimp and fry love the stuff. Also, great for Betta.
 
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