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I finally got a few fishes to put into my 12 gallon tank. The tank is heavilly planted with DIY co2 the tank has been running for about 3 months now.

I added 2 spotted corys and 2 otto. They were very active the first day, then over night to the next morning they were kinda just lying there. They seemed floaty on the bottom and just floated. They look like they are breathing but very very little and it doesnt seem that they are gasping for air

I thought they died but they still moved here and there. So last night I disconnected the Co2 and moved my outlet for my filter sligtly above water to cause surface movment and this morning they are all good and swimming around.

Can my DIY co2 be tomuch for them at night? Should i run an air pump at night with the co2 or disconnect the co2 and run an air pump at night?
 

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You don't technically need to disconnect your CO2 at night, as long as you run an airstone on a timer, all throughout the entire dark period. It's not like you can turn diy CO2 off, so you won't be able to save any of it or anything like that. And as long as the airstone is bubbling, your fish will get plenty of O2, even alongside the CO2.
 

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They could still get CO2 poisoning at night even if the O2 levels in the tank are good, since the plants also will be releasing CO2 beyond what the DIY setup is putting out... so I'd disconnect it for that reason.
I was always under the impression that the point of the night bubbling was to create surface agitation rather than inject O2. Am i thinking the wrong way?
 

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I was always under the impression that the point of the night bubbling was to create surface agitation rather than inject O2. Am i thinking the wrong way?
IMO that's working to opposite ends if you're trying to create surface agitiation with the CO2?
 

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IMO that's working to opposite ends if you're trying to create surface agitiation with the CO2?
Hmmm... maybe we're not quite on the same page. I'll try to better explain my thoughts. You have your bubbler off during the day, meaning that your CO2 will accumulate in the tank to be used by photosynthesizing plants due to low surface agitation and the injection of CO2. At night, the bubbler comes on and the CO2 continues to be injected (as would happen for a DIY system like mentioned in this thread). This increases surface agitation, creating a larger gas exchange between the atmosphere and the water, making the water approach the gas concentrations of the atmosphere during the night, reducing the risk of CO2 poisoning.

Anyway, i don't want to go terribly off topic, because i agree that both bubbling and killing the CO2 injection is the safest way to go. :proud:
 
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