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In the past I've considered doing a large Ecosystem (pretty sure that's the word I'm looking for) set up, breeding and growing Halbut (or another fish) in a large contained pond(s) and using the fish water to feed/grow fruits and vegetables. Us humans would be eating the fruits and vegetables as well as the older fish, leaving the younger generations growing out and continuously breeding. Not going to be doing this anytime soon anymore, but I've always been intrigued.

Well my question is, I've seen a bunch of fish foods and fish meds always stating they are not meant to be used on fish that are meant for human consumption.

Is that solely because they are just not regulated as safe because they have not been tested, yet they may be perfectly safe?

Or are they indeed known as being not safe for human consumption?
If so, any links to such studies/findings?

Know of any fish foods and/or meds that are regulated as safe to be used on fish meant for human consumption?

I guess I could get all human-grade foods and meds, but was wondering if any fish specific items were marketed as such.
 

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You can buy Aquaculture Crumble - same stuff used in fish farms where the fish are for human consumption. And guess what.. it's just a similar blend to any pellet or flake food we'd give to fish in aquariums.

For a fish like Salmon or Trout the food blend may be different to one for Perch.. different fish need different nutrient combinations in some cases.

Medications are also used in Aquaculture (livestock for human consumption), but I'm not sure of the regulations etc around this.
 

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Just making sure you're thinking freshwater fish like trout, perch, catfish, and not saltwater halibut. Salt water and vegetables tend to not mix. (see Idiocracy for further details)
 

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Most of that stuff just says "not for use on food" because it hasn't been tested for use on food and they don't want to have to deal with legal stuff if somebody does happen to find out that it's bad for you. There's absolutely no reason you can't feed regular fish food to fish you intend to eat, except maybe if it's a really cheap brand from China, but that's a bad idea anyway. Just get a decent quality food, and honestly, you could probably eat the fish food itself if you really wanted to. It'd be nasty, but I don't think it'd hurt you any more than dog or cat food would. Same basic idea.
I'm not sure about meds.
I think the word you're looking for is aquaculture. That refers to the growing of various edibles in water that is also being used to grow food fish, in its simplest form. And you'll definitely want to go with a freshwater species like catfish, perch, or maybe tilapia depending on legality.
 

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If I was growing them for my own table I'd condition them well with live foods (feeder fish, earthworms, anything else nutritious) and plenty of good quality pellets. Feed a healthy amount 2x per day. Grow them up big, strong and plump. No need to worry about a limited diet causing health issues in fish so long as a range of foods are provided.
 

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Combining plants (vegetables, mostly) in a hydroponic style and edible fish is Aquaponics. These folks are doing this. The last I heard they are not allowed to sell the fish as food (I have no idea why, it is not because of anything they are doing wrong)

Ouroboros Farms | Commercial Aquaponic Farm | Organic Type Produce | Farm Stand | Half Moon Bay, San Mateo County, CA

Use a high quality fish food. There are even 'organic' ones (I heard about this at a tour of Ouroboros), but I don't know what 'organic' means.
High quality fish food starts with human grade ingredients. Here is one source, ask about quantity pricing.

Natural Tropical Fish Food - Fish Food Online Store

Many meds are not listed for edible fish for a couple of reasons. Mostly because fish metabolism is quite slow (compared to mammals) so traces of the meds may linger.
The other reason is that it has not been tested. The market is much smaller, and the drug companies don't think they could sell enough of the medicine to make it worth the testing.

University of Florida has a LOT of information about farming fish for market. There is a fair amount about aquarium (ornamental) fish, too.

Extension Publications | School of Forest Resources & Conservation
 
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