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First Time Planted Tank Nightmares !

472 Views 5 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  Aaronious
Hi,
Im from Canada (Ottawa) and have had tanks (Fish, Turtles) for a long time. Thought I would get into planted tanks and have been facing a tons of issues.

Tank Details -
30 Gallon Tank
Canister filter (80 G capacity)
Co2 Tank - Fzone 2.5L (3 bubbles a sec)
Nicrew SkyLed PLUS planted tank light
Inline heater 25.5 Degrees
Sunsun UV filter

Plants and Subtrate-
Idea was to have a very simple garden with carpeting plants (Hemianthus Cuba)
with a Sand patch in the middle and Vesicularia ferriei 'Weeping' Bonsai Tree.
The substrate used was Seachem Flourite Dark

We initially tried to do a dry start and as per the instructions misted the plants and closed the lid to create a high moisture tank. 4-5 days later there was white fungus all over and the Hemianthus was looking faded and dry.

Then we decided to flood the tank and fill it up.


Water Vertebrate Pet supply Organism Fish supply


After just 2 days I started seeing a lot of white Fungus/ algae on the tree and plants.


Marine invertebrates Underwater Marine biology Coral Terrestrial animal


This is when the aquarist suggest frequent water changes and adding a lot of good bacteria into the tank. After a few water changes my problems compounded.....

Green Rectangle Output device Lighting Television set


It was like "Grinch Took a Piss" The tank was a lot greener than this but I did not take a photo then. Went back to the aquarist and he gave a UV filter, said it will clear up in 10 days max.
The UV filter worked and the water turned white in a few days. Its still cloudy and the tree is full of the white fungus also the carpeting plants are all dead.

Today I was suggested to take out the wood and boil it in hot water and dip in salt water. Im not sure what to do anymore.

Can anyone help ?

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6g office nano, 20g aio cube, 2 x 40g breeder community and 75g
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I'm sorry to hear you're having so much trouble.

After just 2 days I started seeing a lot of white Fungus/ algae on the tree and plants.
The thin white stuff on the wood is natural in new wood and will eventually go away on it's own. I'm dealing with this myself in a new tank. It looks and smells like ****, but is harmless.

This is when the aquarist suggest frequent water changes and adding a lot of good bacteria into the tank. After a few water changes my problems compounded.....
hmmm.... I'm not sure frequent water changes did you much good. I don't think it hurt you.

It was like "Grinch Took a Piss" The tank was a lot greener than this but I did not take a photo then. Went back to the aquarist and he gave a UV filter, said it will clear up in 10 days max.
The UV filter worked and the water turned white in a few days.
The green water is from too much light, most likely sunlight. The UV filter does a good job fixing things, but know that UV bulb will need to be replaced at some point. The white is a sign the bacterial cycle is maturing and often cleans up in few days to a few weeks.

Its still cloudy and the tree is full of the white fungus also the carpeting plants are all dead.
Are the plants dead or are they "melted"? Plant melt is very common as plants transition to submersed form, but certainly lost a lot of plants doing this hobby.

Today I was suggested to take out the wood and boil it in hot water and dip in salt water. Im not sure what to do anymore.
If the wood is just covered in what looks like thin white snot then leave it be. OR brush it off with a gentle toothbrush and siphon as much out as you can. You won't get it all, but as I said it will go away in a few weeks.

Try to see if the plants are indeed dead or just melted. If the roots and rosettes are firm then your plants will most likely come back with new growth. If they are completely gone then clean out as much of that as you can.
 

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The fungus on the wood is completely natural and normal when going from dry to wet , it will go away on its own or you can scrub it off if you hate it.

The green water may be a slightly more difficult issue. The plants may need time to adjust , you may need to tweak lighting times to balance growth and green water at this point. Small tweaks , no drastic changes. I wouldn’t touch the wood if it were me, it’s likely not causing the green water issue. New tanks go through phases , some trickier than others , the wood fungus isn’t a worry.
 

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3 bubbles a second seems very high for the small amount of plants you have. I’d turn the CO2 and lights down and slowly acclimate to more light and CO2 over a few weeks to 2 months as things fill in, right now you’re feeding the algae.
 

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along with what others have said, I notice you don't have any fast growing plants in there. This could be compounding your issues as there's nothing to outcompete the algae until the cuba really takes off. I would recommend some floating plants or even just some temporary hydrilla to aid along this process.
t
 

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Ditto everything above. Everything is rather normal that you're seeing and totally fixable and okay.

1. Reduce lighting - Usually I start a light at 50% or less and adjust accordingly. If you see algae growing, reduce light; if you see nothing(plants are not growing fast on top of little to no algae) growing, increase light.
2. more if not just keeping up religiously on water changes - Soil is going to have a lot of nutrients in a low nutrient uptake inviornment. At least in it's current situation taking in plants and potency of the soil. Algaes will feed on excess nutrients, so you want to keep that down with consistent water changes. You may find doing a little extra will help in the beginning here.
3. reduce CO2 - This is always the last thing I add or adjust. It helps, but if none of the other things mentioned (fertilizers were not mentioned but they should also be addressed first) are present and dialed in correctly the CO2 is more likely to cause issues than help especially at higher levels. You can keep this low if you really want to for now, or you can probably kill it until things mellow out.

I would do the first bit in each number now if I were you, and then the follow up parts I would work on 1 & 2, and then as mentioned wait to bump back up to the 3 bpm range on CO2. Again, this is my personal opinion, you can do what you think is best and you should do it your way. There is no one way to work this hobby. I mean some things like the nitrogen cycle... but you'll have a good looking tank, just be patient and keep learning.
 
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