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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The title is a lie, but I could really use some advice. I've been the happy owner of a large pack of Otos(13) for the last few months and I've not lost a one. But, in a few days I will be receiving a bakers dozen Brachydanio tinwini. I'm no newbe to Panted tanks or aquarium keeping, I've been in the hobby for a few years now and know how to cycle and keep my tank pristine. My experience with fish is limited to my Otos, which wont be terribly helpful for these new danios.

I have two cultures of daphnia up and running, one Magna the other Pulex. I also have some freeze dried daphnia and New Life Spectrum Small Fish Formula 0.5mm that will probably be their main diet. I'm pretty sure these are good food options, but Im not sure how much or how frequent I should feed?

Any tips or advice would be appreciated. :]

The first photo is of my Daphnia culture tank(19Gal), the second photo is the tank(25Gal) my Otos live in and what I'll moving the Tinwini into after they quarantine.
 

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They're tiny fish with fast metabolisms. You can get by with feeding NLS once per day, but two smaller feedings (NLS in the morning, Daphnia at night) would be better. I think Magna might be a bit too big for the fish, but you'll have to wait and see until they get in to try it. Your biggest challenge will be getting them to actually eat non live foods, but aside from that you should be good. On a side note, .5 mm pellets might also be a bit big, but again, that depends on how big the fish are when you get them in. Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They're tiny fish with fast metabolisms. You can get by with feeding NLS once per day, but two smaller feedings (NLS in the morning, Daphnia at night) would be better. I think Magna might be a bit too big for the fish, but you'll have to wait and see until they get in to try it. Your biggest challenge will be getting them to actually eat non live foods, but aside from that you should be good. On a side note, .5 mm pellets might also be a bit big, but again, that depends on how big the fish are when you get them in. Good Luck!
thanks for the heads up. I love the idea of small fish, but I guess I've underestimated exactly how small these guys are. I could maybe crush the NLS? Unless there is another food you would recommend. Also, is there a better daphnia option I should try?
 

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Now that I think about it, I think I did a stupid, sorry; that NLS should definitely be good for you once you get the fish eating. I mistook the .5 mm for the typical 1-2 mm pellets that NLS definitely puts up and was like "that's the size of the fish's head!" Anyways:

I really like Golden Pearls, back when I had the fish that would eat them haha, they're a really good food for nano fish. I know for a fact that the tinwinis will go to town on black worms, and FD Tubifex seems like a pretty good option if you can't get your hands on any of those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Now that I think about it, I think I did a stupid, sorry; that NLS should definitely be good for you once you get the fish eating. I mistook the .5 mm for the typical 1-2 mm pellets that NLS definitely puts up and was like "that's the size of the fish's head!" Anyways:

I really like Golden Pearls, back when I had the fish that would eat them haha, they're a really good food for nano fish. I know for a fact that the tinwinis will go to town on black worms, and FD Tubifex seems like a pretty good option if you can't get your hands on any of those.
I had a grindel worm culture for them at first, but I didn't enjoy keeping them. Eventually one of those cultures collapsed, and that was disgusting. The others got mites and I gave up on grindel worms. I really would like to culture a live food source for them, and eventually some kubotai as well.
 

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Have you considered raising BBS ? Pretty much everything eats them , they're not real hard to raise , and don't take up too much space .Microworms are another option but might be a bit too small
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Have you considered raising BBS ? Pretty much everything eats them , they're not real hard to raise , and don't take up too much space .Microworms are another option but might be a bit too small

I'm not familiar with all of the acronyms what are BBS?
 

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Baby brine shrimp...a lot more intensive than Grindal worms tbh. There's a website called "WaynesThisAndThat" that pretty accurately describes culturing grindals, shrimp, and other things as well that you can look into.

Can I ask why you didn't like the grindal worm culture? I'm having a great time keeping mine, so I'd love to know your experience with it (aside from the mites. mites are evil little buggers).

I also second the microworms, they're fairly easy to raise, and if you get the culture on mashed potatoes, then you're golden, since it doesn't smell as bad as oatmeal or cornmeal from what I read.

Microworms: Maybe 10 minutes of your time starting a new culture once every 2 weeks, most of the effort is in harvesting them.

Grindal worms: 20 minutes of your time starting a new culture depending on how large the containers are, but mites are a thing.

BBS: Too damn long. If you don't want the cysts that clog up the fish' guts, then you have to rehydrate them (which takes a half hour), then bleach them (3-4 minutes that are horrible because bleach), then wash them and clean them (an additional 10-20 minutes), and then afterwards, you have to put them in saltwater to hatch and aerate that for a further 24 hours or so. Did I mention the cysts are expensive af? Sorry for the mini rant, but I don't believe BBS should be a staple for any species that can just live off of worms and flakes like tinwini (freshwater pipefish on the other hand...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Baby brine shrimp...a lot more intensive than Grindal worms tbh. There's a website called "WaynesThisAndThat" that pretty accurately describes culturing grindals, shrimp, and other things as well that you can look into.

Can I ask why you didn't like the grindal worm culture? I'm having a great time keeping mine, so I'd love to know your experience with it (aside from the mites. mites are evil little buggers).

I also second the microworms, they're fairly easy to raise, and if you get the culture on mashed potatoes, then you're golden, since it doesn't smell as bad as oatmeal or cornmeal from what I read.

Microworms: Maybe 10 minutes of your time starting a new culture once every 2 weeks, most of the effort is in harvesting them.

Grindal worms: 20 minutes of your time starting a new culture depending on how large the containers are, but mites are a thing.

BBS: Too damn long. If you don't want the cysts that clog up the fish' guts, then you have to rehydrate them (which takes a half hour), then bleach them (3-4 minutes that are horrible because bleach), then wash them and clean them (an additional 10-20 minutes), and then afterwards, you have to put them in saltwater to hatch and aerate that for a further 24 hours or so. Did I mention the cysts are expensive af? Sorry for the mini rant, but I don't believe BBS should be a staple for any species that can just live off of worms and flakes like tinwini (freshwater pipefish on the other hand...)
Honestly I liked the Grindels at first, but got bored. I was breeding them for a month or more while I waited to see tinwini appear back on the market. I kept the culture under my bed and fed them regularly. But because they were out of sight, they were also out of mind. So I would only remember to feed them every other day, then once a week, then I collapsed my first culture. The smell was really bad. Then the other cultures got mites and I still had no fish to feed them too. So I just lost interest. Maybe if I could feed them to my fish I'd o liked them, but I gave up on them over three months ago and have only just found a buyer selling tinwini. Fortunately I find daphnia more interesting. Might try moina if Magna and Pulex will be too large. Thanks for all the info, I have no interest in culturing brine shrimp I had looked into them but I can't breed them so I have no interest.
 
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