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I can't seem to grow plants with my Ray II. I have three 33g tanks setup the same, (similar type plants, substrate, fert and wc schedule) and set them up within 2 weeks of eachother. They each house a pair of angelfish only.

They each have about 1 inch of MGOPS capped with an inch to an inch and a half of pea gravel, with exception to the tank at the top right which has a deeper dirt bed. I admit, I'm being a stingy with the liquid ferts because the tank with the problems also has cyanobacteria and I'm trying hard to eradicate it without using antibiotics. I stopped dosing in that problem tank, but recently added a few root tabs under the swords.

The tank on the bottom left has two t8's for lighting. The tank on the top right has a mix of CFL 65k and LED 5000k. The tank at the bottom right is the problem tank, with the Finnex Ray II.

The plants in that problem tank just don't grow. They grow so slowly and stunted. The diameter of the stem plants are tiny and plant leaves grow bushy, small and short. My hygo rosanervig and amazon swords just melted, I've never seen anything like that! I can't hardly even grow floating brazillian pennywort. The one sword that is doing well is planted in a pot and was well established before I added it.

My feelings are that the light emmited from the Finnex is too bright, and/or in the wrong spectrum for what I prefer and am used to. I don't want to use pressurized co2 and I find dosing with Excel to be too costly (I have 11 planted tanks!)

I posted two other pics of the problem tank, one is a crop from the pic of all the tanks, and the other is from November 2015 when I first added the Finnex. Honestly, it seems the tank became worse after I switched to a glass top from the molded black plastic one. The opening for the light in the plastic lid was 1 foot smaller than the fixture, so 6" of the fixture was blacked out on both ends.

Anyone else have ideas? Or had similar experiences?

Here are the pics:

1) The three tanks together
2) The problem tank November 3, 2015
3) The problem tank April 19, 2016
 

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LED lights kill low and medium light plants in my experience, unless you cover them with some wax paper, or tape, or add a thick glass top, etc...they are very intense, as can be seen in your pictures. I'm working with LED's (spot and flood lights for hydroponics), and have them covered with crystal glass to lessen the intensity. I hope it works. LED's have a learning curve unlike CFL's, T8, etc.

Maybe you could raise the light? If not, I think cutting the intensity somehow would be a good experiment.
 

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Ok, so I tested the pH, but I lost the color chart, not that it matters much since the pH is almost identical in each tank lol. I'm guessing it's about 7.4. It is higher than I want it to be though, considering I checked the pH before the lights came on. I believe it's the dirt substrates that are buffering these tanks, my other tanks that are not dirted have a pH of 7.0 or below.

I find out hard to believe that the light is too strong for medium light plant too, but my tank shows otherwise.

I'm thinking about simply adding the black molded lid back, where the sides are shaded. I also have flourescent light screening seperating the light from the water, instead of glass that must have broken. It's plastic and had yellowed a bit. I'd be reducing the light that way. I already tried reducing the photoperiod to 7hrs, but the two tanks on the right side are on the same timer, so I didn't want to reduce it too much. I could try reducing it to 6hrs?

LED lights kill low and medium light plants in my experience, unless you cover them with some wax paper, or tape, or add a thick glass top, etc...they are very intense, as can be seen in your pictures. I'm working with LED's (spot and flood lights for hydroponics), and have them covered with crystal glass to lessen the intensity. I hope it works. LED's have a learning curve unlike CFL's, T8, etc.

Maybe you could raise the light? If not, I think cutting the intensity somehow would be a good experiment.
Thanks, I was thinking the same thing, but it seems so weird that the fixture would kill these plants. It could be that with the more intense light, that I need co2 and can't get away with not using it. I have the light raised already, but could try to raise it higher :)

I have Beamswork LEDs on other tanks and don't have problems like this tank. Since the stems seem to grow short and compact, I wonder if it has something to do with the Finnex spectrum. I think it's about 7000k? My other tanks are/or mix of 5000k-6500k and 10000k. It's my only tank in the 7000k spectrum.
 

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Thanks, I was thinking the same thing, but it seems so weird that the fixture would kill these plants. It could be that with the more intense light, that I need co2 and can't get away with not using it. I have the light raised already, but could try to raise it higher :)

I have Beamswork LEDs on other tanks and don't have problems like this tank. Since the stems seem to grow short and compact, I wonder if it has something to do with the Finnex spectrum. I think it's about 7000k? My other tanks are/or mix of 5000k-6500k and 10000k. It's my only tank in the 7000k spectrum.
I think you are correct. Higher intensity lights (not concerned with spectrum) may need to have CO2 and/or better ferts. I don't think the spectrum looks very good either. Totally agree the two (intensity/spectrum) could be putting your plants at a disadvantage. Maybe lessen intensity and add some inexpensive supplemental lights? Maybe daylight CFL's or a T2 linear bulb?
 

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Thanks, I was thinking the same thing, but it seems so weird that the fixture would kill these plants. It could be that with the more intense light, that I need co2 and can't get away with not using it. I have the light raised already, but could try to raise it higher :)

I have Beamswork LEDs on other tanks and don't have problems like this tank. Since the stems seem to grow short and compact, I wonder if it has something to do with the Finnex spectrum. I think it's about 7000k? My other tanks are/or mix of 5000k-6500k and 10000k. It's my only tank in the 7000k spectrum.
The 6500k is theoretically not much different than the 7000k of the
RayII and theoretically has a better spectrum than 10000k (esp. in LED)
You can hack in a dimmer on the RayII as long as it runs a seperate power supply.
This will work albeit it a bit crudely:
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Free...4209816.html?spm=2114.40010408.3.5.5gsOlq&s=p
 

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Thanks for the link on the dimmer.

So, you don't think it had anything to do with the 7000k spectrum? My tanks with 10000k also have a 5000k or 65k suplementary LED fixture. One of my tanks (a 46g bow) has a 10kk accent LED with one 64k t5 and it grows amazingly well. The light is the only difference and I have different spectrum setups on most of my tanks. However, like I said, that's the only tank with 7000k. Boggles my brain....

I think you are correct. Higher intensity lights (not concerned with spectrum) may need to have CO2 and/or better ferts. I don't think the spectrum looks very good either. Totally agree the two (intensity/spectrum) could be putting your plants at a disadvantage. Maybe lessen intensity and add some inexpensive supplemental lights? Maybe daylight CFL's or a T2 linear bulb?
I'm so lost with this tank because of the cyanobacteria in it too. I stopped dosing ferts for a while, thinking it was feeding the cyano. Although, I don't know how I feel about adding ferts when I don't have additional co2. I will probably try reducing the intensity if anything. It feels like trial and error.

Btw, this might be a 'captain obvious' statement, but isn't 7000k more for iwagumi style tanks, or tanks that are all green carpetted? I wouldn't worry about height growth if that was the case.
 

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Thanks for the link on the dimmer.

So, you don't think it had anything to do with the 7000k spectrum? My tanks with 10000k also have a 5000k or 65k suplementary LED fixture. One of my tanks (a 46g bow) has a 10kk accent LED with one 64k t5 and it grows amazingly well. The light is the only difference and I have different spectrum setups on most of my tanks. However, like I said, that's the only tank with 7000k. Boggles my brain....
no, there really have been few complaints about the RayII and growth. color is another issue though.

Many ran a RayII + monster Ray or Planted plus to make up for the color..

Sorry a bit o/t..
 

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A while back I found out that the RayII diodes were lensedat 90 degrees.
BUT I can't be positive about the source.
 

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A while back I found out that the RayII diodes were lensedat 90 degrees.
BUT I can't be positive about the source.
Wow. I never would have thought those RayII lenses were 90° ........is there a way I can find out for sure by measuring?

About spectrum:

These are my feelings and observations.
The 7000k spectrum appears much bluer than 65k and even 10000k. I realize different LED manufacturer's 'idea' of 7000k might not be same, but typically, the 7000k appears bluer and the 10000k is closer to the colour rendition of the 65k spectrum. In many cases, the 7000k looks great over an iwagumi tank, where it "jade'ns" up the green plants and keeps them growing short and compact.

I wonder if anyone has success growing tall/colour plants without using a additional/accent lamp.

I bought this RayII off of a friend. The plants in his tank grew in the same manner.

I'm testing the RayII with the black cover added back on. The tank looks considerably more yellow/darker. I'll post the results in a couple weeks....

But I'm doubtful that a RayII can grow tall colourful plants. I mean actually colourful (as I know the spectrum washes out reds).

Before and after pics -Dimming
 

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I'm so lost with this tank because of the cyanobacteria in it too. I stopped dosing ferts for a while, thinking it was feeding the cyano. Although, I don't know how I feel about adding ferts when I don't have additional co2. I will probably try reducing the intensity if anything. It feels like trial and error.

Btw, this might be a 'captain obvious' statement, but isn't 7000k more for iwagumi style tanks, or tanks that are all green carpetted? I wouldn't worry about height growth if that was the case.

In my experience Cyanobacteria in FW is due solely to excessive light. I've only gotten it when I tried to put dual T5HO on a 20g long... As soon as I cleaned it up and removed the light it went away, never came back. Excessive nutrients alone rarely cause algae unless there is a huge imbalance- in this case it's probably too much light, not enough nutrients or co2.
 
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