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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
10 gallon heavily planted since May. I was showing 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and 0 nitrates.Pet shop thought even though I have 5 otos and plenty of bladder snails that it might not be fully cycled(lack of nitrates). So they gave me 3 Fire cherry shrimp to see how they would do. Long story short, everything is fine after 3 weeks that they have been in my tank. So I went back to the shop and purchased 8 more shrimp. It wasn’t until I got home and was doing a 4 hour drip acclamation that I noticed these cherry shrimp were not as dark red as my Fire shrimp. Turns out the person I was dealing with at the shop on earlier visits wasn’t there when I bought my shrimp from the same tank. The other person didn’t know I had Fire shrimp and did not tell me they were out of stock. The ones in the tank looked like what I had and the tank was labeled Fire shrimp. But what they got in were a very nice grade of red cherry shrimp.So I kept them. It would have been a 20 mile trek back to the shop and I didn’t want to go back or stress the shrimp. So I was looking up what may happen when they breed. From what I can find out is the offspring from both will produce a lower grade Fire Shrimp and a higher grade cherry shrimp. Since they both are cherry shrimp and the difference is the color grading I’m still happy with them. I never planned on selling them and don’t think I’ll cull any. But my question is …. Is there a chance they would go back to a wild state of coloration somewhere down the line, If I add anymore they would be Fire Shrimp. I have only the one tank and at this time don’t plan on starting another tank.
 

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I'm sure some shrimp experts know a lot more about this but my understanding is that they only go back to wild type coloration if you breed entirely different colors together, and even that will take quite a few generations. In your case you should get a mix of grades between the parents. Even if you have the most perfect shrimp parents some of the offspring may still have poor coloration. You can cull the poorly colored ones before they breed to keep your colony a higher grade. It's also not a bad idea to occasionally add some new shrimp to the gene pool so they don't inbreed too much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm sure some shrimp experts know a lot more about this but my understanding is that they only go back to wild type coloration if you breed entirely different colors together, and even that will take quite a few generations. In your case you should get a mix of grades between the parents. Even if you have the most perfect shrimp parents some of the offspring may still have poor coloration. You can cull the poorly colored ones before they breed to keep your colony a higher grade. It's also not a bad idea to occasionally add some new shrimp to the gene pool so they don't inbreed too much.
Yes, I’m thinking about adding more Fire shrimp when I do buy more later down the road. Thanks
 

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they only go back to wild type coloration if you breed entirely different colors together, and even that will take quite a few generations
Only takes 2-3 generations.

But red shrimp with red shrimp are fine. Likely no need to worry, @CJP53. Calling something "Fire" is just a made-up term. Generally means really red but there's no real grade or chart or anything uniform in the hobby. Honestly? It doesn't matter. You still have to cull if you want solid coloration - regardless of the fancy name.

Pet shop thought even though I have 5 otos and plenty of bladder snails that it might not be fully cycled(lack of nitrates).
For a tank to really be cycled - even though it's fine now - you typically need to dose ammonia on a daily basis. That's so you know the tank can process a fixed amount of ammonia within a 24-hour time period.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks,only difference between the two is Fire have red legs and from what I saw on my new ones they seem to be we white. Will see about culling, I might set up another planted tank for them. It’s going to be very difficult to catch them as my tank is heavily planted.
 

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Thanks,only difference between the two is Fire have red legs and from what I saw on my new ones they seem to be we white.
Becarful that too much culling might result in weaker gens. A little bit tolerance will give you hardier shrimps.
It’s going to be very difficult to catch them as my tank is heavily planted.
It's much easier to catch them if your net is white and it's opening is at least about the size of your palm.
 

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Good to know, I do have a small white net.Thanks
Culling doesn't result in weaker genes like suggested - you'll still have plenty of shrimp for them to be strong. If it truly harmed shrimp so urgently and in the manner suggested? None of us in the hobby would have any shrimp left after a few decades of this practice. So don't worry much about that. You can always add fresh blood to your gene pool with ease.

The color and size of your net also doesn't matter at all. You can use anything. It's best, though, to use something with really fine mesh that won't harm shrimp legs. My favorite nets are telescoping and are probably about 5cm or 2in in diameter - so really small. You can also use a clear cup to catch them. It's really up to you and your preferences.
 

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Culling doesn't result in weaker genes like suggested - you'll still have plenty of shrimp for them to be strong. If it truly harmed shrimp so urgently and in the manner suggested? None of us in the hobby would have any shrimp left after a few decades of this practice. So don't worry much about that. You can always add fresh blood to your gene pool with ease.
Although it surely should have some effect, you are right. Nothing to worry about.

The color and size of your net also doesn't matter at all.
I'm not sure about the size maybe it doesn't matter but I'm sure about the color. With a black net, it's amazingly hard for me to catch them but peace of cake with a white net.
 
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