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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been researching a regulator build for some time now and I finally think I have a grasp on it. I found one for sale it is a Harris HP702-125-580-A. Will this work as long as I change out the stem for a CGA 320? I know the ranges are a bit high and I believe it is a dual stage. Any help will be greatly appreciated!!
 

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Algae Grower
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That's a nice unit. If it is indeed an "A" model, you won't be able to use an atomizer since it will only do about 15-20psi max. You will be able to use a glass diffuser, reactor or needle wheel pump though.
 

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Plant Clown
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It's an attractive (chrome-plated) dual stage regulator. Like almost any dual stage, it's good quality, and will work fine. Just checked on it - the "A" just means it has a 1/4" low pressure valve. Useless for us, and can be removed. It puts out 125psi, so it's fine, but the working pressure gauge will read 200psi, I believe. Which is a bit high for precision. It will make it a bit difficult to find the exact same working pressure after a refill, but then, tweaking a needle valve once every few months isn't an incredibly high price to pay.

As I said, it's an attractive regulator. What you need to remember, though, is that if you're going to buy a "silvery" regulator specifically for its aesthetic value, you're going to want to use stainless steel fittings, solenoid, needle valve, etc. Otherwise, it looks odd. If you don't care about looks, then go for it! I have a CONCOA 312 chrome dual reg that I like a lot, but never invested the hefty cash into all the stainless parts for it. So it just looks weird.

You can pay to have pieces chromed or nickel-plated, but after costs, stainless might even be cheaper.
 

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Plant Clown
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Yes, it will be fine. The "A" suffix is a little confusing - at first I thought, like in some other brands, that it meant it would put out 20-25psi and have a 0-30 working pressure gauge. However, it means something completely different, and it's the "125" after the basic model number that denotes the max working pressure.

An atomizer generally needs 30-40 psi to function (so any reg with a 0-60 gauge would work).

Just out of curiosity, how much is the reg? You might want to check in with the price and get some feedback on whether it's worth it. Also, new or used? Honestly, it probably makes no difference from a functional standpoint - used for our purposes, dual stages, if they start in working order, last practically forever. But from an aesthetic standpoint, it might matter.
 

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Plant Clown
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I'm not sure what that particular model retails for. In general, though, a new dual stage regulator for less than $100 is a good deal. I prefer used, as they tend to be quite cheap (nice ones can be found for $20-40 shipped if you're patient, and you can get a more precise 0-60 or 0-100 working pressure gauge) and I place less value on aesthetics.

But I predict you won't regret it if you pick this one up. Just remember that you'll spend probably as much as you pay for that regulator on a solenoid, needle valve, and fittings, and that's if you go for the (cheaper) brass styles. Stainless will probably double that price. More if you're feeling fancy.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I plan on running a burkert 6011 with an ideal metering valve and some swagelok stainless steel fittings. (Trying to go Fancy) Hope it will all work out!! Thanks for all of your advices.
 

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I plan on running a burkert 6011 with an ideal metering valve and some swagelok stainless steel fittings. (Trying to go Fancy) Hope it will all work out!! Thanks for all of your advices.
it is really never end if you want it to be fancier :icon_smil
 

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Algae Grower
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6,444 Posts
Yes, it will be fine. The "A" suffix is a little confusing - at first I thought, like in some other brands, that it meant it would put out 20-25psi and have a 0-30 working pressure gauge. However, it means something completely different, and it's the "125" after the basic model number that denotes the max working pressure.

An atomizer generally needs 30-40 psi to function (so any reg with a 0-60 gauge would work).

Just out of curiosity, how much is the reg? You might want to check in with the price and get some feedback on whether it's worth it. Also, new or used? Honestly, it probably makes no difference from a functional standpoint - used for our purposes, dual stages, if they start in working order, last practically forever. But from an aesthetic standpoint, it might matter.
Boy, I botched that reply. My memory failed me there. When you don't know about a particular model, you can just google the make and model # and there's usually a pdf that pops up.
it is really never end if you want it to be fancier :icon_smil
Ain't that the truth...
 

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Plant Clown
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Ha very true! If I have a split manifold between 2 tanks , will both outlets have enough pressure to run them( atonomizers)?
Yes. But it starts getting tricky when you need specific pressures on multiple tanks. You'll want the same needle valve on each, and you'll want the same type of diffuser. Otherwise, It's not the regulator that will make it difficult - it's the atomizers.

I had one atomizer that required a bit over 45psi to function, and two that only needed 30, and they were on three different sized tanks. I had 3 identical metering valves that weren't capable of shutting off flow completely (many metering valves aren't). One of the 30psi atomizers was on a 10g, and when I had enough pressure to run the other two (on larger tanks), I wasn't able to reduce the flow enough for an ideal setting on the 10g. Too much CO2. So I had to tweak things to get it all to work.

However, with just two tanks, you'll probably be fine.

But, to answer what I think your concern with the original question was, your regulator will have no problem running two atomizers. In fact, you could have six of them, and with your working pressure set at 40psi or so, you'd have no problem. A regulator with a 0-60 working pressure gauge would have no difficulty, either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Okay guys just a little update, I scored the regulator for 59$ plus shipping (19$) so it should be arriving within the week. (I think i got a pretty good deal). Anywho, I wanted to run through my parts list of fittings and everything to make sure that everything will work right the first time through. Not sure if my wallet will allow all stainless everything at the moment so it might be brass on the burket 6011 solenoid.

First thing is to replace the 580 stem with Smith chrome plated CGA 320 Nut and Nipple( parts #'s 2-E99-320C13 and 2-CGA320-1P)

Out of the regulator to the Post Body I will need a 1/4 to 1/8 Hex reducing Nipple (Swagelok SS-4-HRN-2) then to a Street Elbow (Swagelok SS-2-SE) to the Berkert 6011 with buna seals. Then from the solenoid will leave out through another street elbow(same as above) then to 1/8 male nipple fitting (Swagelok SS-2-HN) to the Ideal Valve ( V54-1-12) followed by a check valve of some sort. Any suggestions??? To a JBJ bubble counter.

Does this setup work? I have tried to do all the homework I just need someone to double check my math and give me a grade HAHA!

And in looking at atonomizers at GLA I saw they had some with built in check valves. Will my one in the post body be sufficient or should I couple it with one of these. (Or should I stick with a simple glass diffusor? I do not have a canister filter otherwise I would do in-line.

Thanks for all the help guys!!
 

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Plant Clown
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Go with the Atomizer - as long as you have the required pressure, you won't be sorry. For the check valve between the needle valve and bc, you'll want something with a cracking pressure of 1psi or less. Clippard has a couple to choose from, as does Swagelok (though much more expensive). Search Evilbay for 1/8" NPT check valves and check on the cracking pressure. In addition, you'll want an inline check valve, as Oldpunk suggested. There are many varieties, but you'll probably want something with 10-32 ports and either compression nuts or barbs (generally bought separately). There are those cheap silver ones available from a few sources, including Evilbay, if you'd like. Clippard is also popular. And USPlastics.com has some really cheap ones that a couple members have posted good reviews on.
 
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