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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all! I’m starting a new tank and need some advice. I have the 60(H). 60x45x45-(32gallon). I want to go with an Oase Biomaster filter. Is the 350 overkill for the tank size? Lily pipes are definitely a source of confusion. The pipes for the 350 are 16mm. Are 17mm lily pipes too big for the tank? Do I need to adapt to smaller lily pipes? I’m sure this has been addressed in another thread. I’ve searched and am having trouble piecing together what info I have found. Thanks in advance!
 

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To answer the first question about whether the filter capacity is too large for a 60H- If you agree with the school of thought that more filtration is only a good thing, then no not at all, I think it's perfect for a 32gal.

As for the second question, a 16/22mm hose diameter is the largest of the three common sizes used with canister filters. The 16 refers to the inner diameter. The 22 refers to the outer diameter, so that accounts for the wall thickness of the hose. a 17mm lily pipe is what would be used with it (a nice tight fit). Will it be too large looking for a 60H. I personally think it might.

My personal experience with this:
I have a Biomaster 250 on a 60p (17.1 US gal). And I love it, but I've have had to reduce the flow on it. The filter itself allows you to do that but another way I help restrict it is by using a smaller size lily pipe than what the filter calls for. People commonly do this and it's perfectly fine for the filter. How you would go about this - You would have to get an adapter for both the inlet and outlet hoses that converts your hose from 16/22 to 12/16 (added an amazon link to an example). You can find them even cheaper at hardware stores, but they won't have the little finger grips. You can also do this with a quick tap, though that's harder to find. There are some brands that have two built in diameters (link #2) or with brands like JBL, you can combine a 16/22 with a 12/16 and make it yourself, though I've never been able to find them in the states. This may be possible with Eheim ones, but I don't have any on hand to try out. Finally one clever option that I saw George Farmer once do is to take a centimeter length cut of a 12/16 hose and slide it onto the bottom of the 13mm lily pipe. Now you have a 13mm lily pipe with a 17mm connection point. I attached a photo of my 60p doing just this. The benefit of this route is that it's cheap and easier to clean the hoses since without an adapter in the way. the downside is the hose portion will look slightly larger.

adapter example:

quicktap with 2 sizes built in:

1027567
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To answer the first question about whether the filter capacity is too large for a 60H- If you agree with the school of thought that more filtration is only a good thing, then no not at all, I think it's perfect for a 32gal.

As for the second question, a 16/22mm hose diameter is the largest of the three common sizes used with canister filters. The 16 refers to the inner diameter. The 22 refers to the outer diameter, so that accounts for the wall thickness of the hose. a 17mm lily pipe is what would be used with it (a nice tight fit). Will it be too large looking for a 60H. I personally think it might.

My personal experience with this:
I have a Biomaster 250 on a 60p (17.1 US gal). And I love it, but I've have had to reduce the flow on it. The filter itself allows you to do that but another way I help restrict it is by using a smaller size lily pipe than what the filter calls for. People commonly do this and it's perfectly fine for the filter. How you would go about this - You would have to get an adapter for both the inlet and outlet hoses that converts your hose from 16/22 to 12/16 (added an amazon link to an example). You can find them even cheaper at hardware stores, but they won't have the little finger grips. You can also do this with a quick tap, though that's harder to find. There are some brands that have two built in diameters (link #2) or with brands like JBL, you can combine a 16/22 with a 12/16 and make it yourself, though I've never been able to find them in the states. This may be possible with Eheim ones, but I don't have any on hand to try out. Finally one clever option that I saw George Farmer once do is to take a centimeter length cut of a 12/16 hose and slide it onto the bottom of the 13mm lily pipe. Now you have a 13mm lily pipe with a 17mm connection point. I attached a photo of my 60p doing just this. The benefit of this route is that it's cheap and easier to clean the hoses since without an adapter in the way. the downside is the hose portion will look slightly larger.

adapter example:

quicktap with 2 sizes built in:

View attachment 1027567
PERFECT! Thank you for the explanation and links! I still haven’t ruled out the 600.
 

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As long as you can adjust the flow then you should be good. I currently run 2 filters on my 30 Breeder. Eheim ecco pro 2236 and a Fluval 405. I have the eheim filter running a bit lower flow than max and same goes for the Fluval.
 

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Hi all! I’m starting a new tank and need some advice. I have the 60(H). 60x45x45-(32gallon). I want to go with an Oase Biomaster filter. Is the 350 overkill for the tank size? Lily pipes are definitely a source of confusion. The pipes for the 350 are 16mm. Are 17mm lily pipes too big for the tank? Do I need to adapt to smaller lily pipes? I’m sure this has been addressed in another thread. I’ve searched and am having trouble piecing together what info I have found. Thanks in advance!
The Biomaster Thermo is a good choice. I used a 250 on my 60P/25gal tank and now I use a 600 on my 120P/75gal tank. Both provided plenty of flow for those tanks with the one caveat that you need to keep your scape and plants positioned/trimmed to allow for good circular unobstructed flow, especially along the back of the tank.

The tubing and fittings that comes with all of the Biomaster Thermo filters are 5/8"(~17mm) and so work perfectly with 17/22 lily pipes. Here again one caveat. The stock Biomaster tubing is remarkably stiff. It is hard to bend and to keep tension off of the pipes. I use ADA clear hose from Aqua Forest Aquarium in San Francisco. Yes. I know that you might be able to find something similar and cheaper from McMaster or Home Depot but this is a sure thing. It will come coiled and not kinked, like some clear tubing bought online. Run hot tap water through it for a while and then stretch it out for a day or so. Then you can cut it to size. When you make your first cuts consider leaving more that you think you need. You can always take more off later but adding on ...not so much.

You will love the Biomaster prefilter. Buy a second set of prefilter sponges from Amazon. They are cheap. Just swap them out each week. Speeds the cleaning up. I also drilled extra holes in the plastic pipe that the prefilter sponges are threaded onto. This is supposed to help with better flow. And finally consider getting some Eheim double tap tubing connectors. They are worth every penny and will probably save you the cost of breaking a couple of sets of glass pipes when cleaning!

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Biomaster Thermo is a good choice. I used a 250 on my 60P/25gal tank and now I use a 600 on my 120P/75gal tank. Both provided plenty of flow for those tanks with the one caveat that you need to keep your scape and plants positioned/trimmed to allow for good circular unobstructed flow, especially along the back of the tank.

The tubing and fittings that comes with all of the Biomaster Thermo filters are 5/8"(~17mm) and so work perfectly with 17/22 lily pipes. Here again one caveat. The stock Biomaster tubing is remarkably stiff. It is hard to bend and to keep tension off of the pipes. I use ADA clear hose from Aqua Forest Aquarium in San Francisco. Yes. I know that you might be able to find something similar and cheaper from McMaster or Home Depot but this is a sure thing. It will come coiled and not kinked, like some clear tubing bought online. Run hot tap water through it for a while and then stretch it out for a day or so. Then you can cut it to size. When you make your first cuts consider leaving more that you think you need. You can always take more off later but adding on ...not so much.

You will love the Biomaster prefilter. Buy a second set of prefilter sponges from Amazon. They are cheap. Just swap them out each week. Speeds the cleaning up. I also drilled extra holes in the plastic pipe that the prefilter sponges are threaded onto. This is supposed to help with better flow. And finally consider getting some Eheim double tap tubing connectors. They are worth every penny and will probably save you the cost of breaking a couple of sets of glass pipes when cleaning!

Enjoy!
I am buying all of my equipment from AFA as I live in San Francisco. They are a great shop and I want to give them my business. Thanks for the tips!
 
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