The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,984 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you feed your fish while the lights are off? I've recently been trying to abide by the "feed more often in less amounts" rule. In the morning I dump some spirulina flakes in my 29 community and don't really have time (running late always) to watch them. The lights aren't on, but they seem to be active enough -- especially the pearl gouramis.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
during the winter months when many of use go to work and come home while the sun is still down, it's best to feed your fish in the morning than the evening as the fish are active in the morning, and sleepy in the evening. you can also alter your tank light timer for the same 8 hour window, but simply have it go on mid afternoon and off in the evening, or on early morning and off mid afternoon. that way, you get to see your fish during the work week. underfeeding your fish is very commendable as your fish manage just fine on less food, and your tank water will stay a lot healthier. another idea is to get one of those $15 battery powered drum feeders, that way you can control the food quantity, and not risk forgetting to feed them as your rush out the door every morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,984 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks spypet. I guess I am curious if folks think that the fish are necessarily sleeping when the aquarium lights are off. I typically see quite a bit of activity when I look in there in the morning prior to lights on, so I wondered if that would be an okay time to feed. Also wondered if the fish would be able to see/smell/sense the food in the relative dark. Just curious I guess. Great info on feeding in the morning rather than the evening, although they seem to eat voraciously in the evenings for me! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
I'd be glad to hear more folks' opinions on this.

For years I fed very little - and think I was underfeeding almost to the point of starvation. Having increased the amounts I feed - my fish are healthier and show more growth.

I also aspire to more frequent small feedings of various foods. And I have my lighting timed such that they turn on after I go to work so they will be on when I get home. As such, I only have a couple of hours in the evenings during which to drop in a couple of small feedings - generally a pinch or 2 of flake, some worms, and some sinking shrimp/algae. On weekend days, I intentionally spread feedings further throughout the lighted period.

If I thought the fish would eat it, I'd drop a pinch of flake in each tank before I left in the morning, but I don't want to do so if it will tend to just end up on the bottom uneaten until the cories/plecos get to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
562 Posts
My aquariums are all in my room. When my alarm goes off, and I start moving around, I'm pretty sure that's when the fish start waking up. I leave all four tank lights off until I get home, but I do leave the shades up so the plants get a little bit of light during the day (all ambient light). They do eat like ravenous little pigs (I've got bettas and angels...) when I drop the food in in the morning in the dark. Then they eat like ravenous pigs when I get home from work and the lights turn on.

But my lights are only on for about 6 hours every day. BGA was just not going away otherwise...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,666 Posts
I guess I am curious if folks think that the fish are necessarily sleeping when the aquarium lights are off.
Not so much "sleeping" as "assuming coloration and movement patterns to evade predators" as hardwired for survival. Note that some (nocturnal catfish) have the opposite behavior and go looking for atypical color and movement patterns.

Generally the smell of food will tempt a fish to look around some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,984 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm good discussion. I think that the combination of a change in ambient conditions (lights on, moving around) and the smell of food would be enough to wake any fish up enough to hunt down some food. The question then becomes (for me) whether or not the fish can find the food in near absolute darkness. I wouldn't be hte least bit suprised if they could!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top