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I had planned on holding out longer, before the switch to pressurized CO2, but the pieces came to together quicker than planned.

I decided to try and save a buck and buy the parts myself and assemble it myself.

I got a solenoid and needle valve off a broken regulator that I got for $25 in the Swap-n-Shop. In addition, I have a fabco needle value on its way (also from the Swap-n-Shop).

I bought a cheap Clark regulator on E-Bay. I think it was $39 + $10 shipping.

Then, I found a welding supply store about 3/4 a mile from my house and picked up a tank full of CO2. I think I got a bad deal here, but I guess I get it back if I return the tank. I paid something like $120 for a 5 lb tank.

Anyway, the Clark regular came with a "flair" fitting, that is not so easy to connect with the solenoid. So, I simply used two barbs and a short piece of tubing to connect the two - anyone see any problems with this???




After taking that picture, I put the whole system together - but did not hook it up to my tank yet - for a test run.



It seems to be working fine.

Again, am I missing anything? Does anyone see anything here that I should be concerned about?

I'm thinking of adding some hose clamps to the tube/barb connections, just to make extra sure.

Thanks,
 

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I decided to try and save a buck and buy the parts myself and assemble it myself.
Great choice!

Then, I found a welding supply store about 3/4 a mile from my house and picked up a tank full of CO2. I think I got a bad deal here, but I guess I get it back if I return the tank. I paid something like $120 for a 5 lb tank.
You definitely got ripped off here. Most 5 lb CO2 tanks are usually a maximum of 70 USD.

Anyway, the Clark regular came with a "flair" fitting, that is not so easy to connect with the solenoid. So, I simply used two barbs and a short piece of tubing to connect the two - anyone see any problems with this???
The only disadvantage is that the entire setup does not look as compact and that with more pieces attached, there is a higher likelihood that a leak is present.

Again, am I missing anything? Does anyone see anything here that I should be concerned about?
As mentioned above, I would try to reduce the number of parts on the overall regulator build. I would take off the flare fitting on the regulator body (put the regulator in a vise and use a long handled wrench to take it off).

Get a proper adapter (it appears to be 1/4" to 1/8") to connect the regulator to the solenoid. Remove the stock needle valve from the solenoid and connect the elbow (with the hose barb) directly to the solenoid.

When you get your Fabco NV55, connect it in-line after the hose barb on the solenoid.

I'm thinking of adding some hose clamps to the tube/barb connections, just to make extra sure.
Hose clamps won't really make a difference if there is a miniscule leak.

One last comment is that you should not be using teflon tape, as a little bit may break off and get stuck inside your solenoid, causing it to not shut off fully. As a result, you would still get CO2 flowing through your system. Instead, non-hardening pipe compound should be used instead (can be bought in the plumbing section of any hardware store for a few dollars).
 
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