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I know that getting oxygen to the nitrifying bacteria is good. It is why a wet/dry filter is so effective. I don't have the $ to invest in oxygen tanks to feed into the tank like Tom Barr. However, I've been considering using an air bubbler and feeding the air into the intake of my canister filter. I would use a valve to reduce the air flow so that it doesn't harm the motor or make my tank look like sprite from all of the bubbles. Thoughts?
 

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I know that getting oxygen to the nitrifying bacteria is good. It is why a wet/dry filter is so effective. I don't have the $ to invest in oxygen tanks to feed into the tank like Tom Barr. However, I've been considering using an air bubbler and feeding the air into the intake of my canister filter. I would use a valve to reduce the air flow so that it doesn't harm the motor or make my tank look like sprite from all of the bubbles. Thoughts?
It can hurt the filter, yes. You can always go to your LFS and pick up some bacteria to get a kick start. Or if you know someone with a mature setup you can get some old filter media from them and install it in your filter. My best advice to you is just be patient.
 

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Yeah, that's not a good idea. The air will cause aeration in your filter. Possibly damaging it. It could also make the filter lose it's prime, and it most certainly will make it noisy. I tried injecting my CO2 reactor with air as well as CO2 as an experiment since it only cost an extra valve. Any amount of air just ended up trapped until it finally blew out bubbles into the tank.
 

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I know that getting oxygen to the nitrifying bacteria is good. It is why a wet/dry filter is so effective. I don't have the $ to invest in oxygen tanks to feed into the tank like Tom Barr. However, I've been considering using an air bubbler and feeding the air into the intake of my canister filter. I would use a valve to reduce the air flow so that it doesn't harm the motor or make my tank look like sprite from all of the bubbles. Thoughts?
Chances are you're confusing a few ideas here. The "oxygen" tank you refer to is likely not oxygen but is rather carbon dioxide to aid in plant growth. The "sprite bubbles" is a common problem when people inject CO2 in the method you're describing. The oxygen in the atmosphere is plenty for our fishtanks. I see no reason to try and include pressurized oxygen in any setup.

Dont try to put an air stone under the intake of your canister filter. Oxygenated water is flowing through your canister filter and provides enough oxygen for the bacteria to thrive. Its worked for thousands of people already and will surely work for you too!
 

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Canister filters are not meant to have air in them.

When using an air stone most of the o2 is dissolved from the bubbles causing surface agitation not o2 being dissolved from the bubbles.

Yes you are right about wet/dry filters. Bacteria colonies grow better in highly oxygenated environments.

I've seen hang on back type filters modified to have air stones in the bio media chamber. How beneficial/particle it is could be open for debate.

Personally after 25 years of keeping fish my filters work just fine without such modifications.

If you want extreem biological filtration fluidized filters are another option to wet/dry. They work really well.
 

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However, I've been considering using an air bubbler and feeding the air into the intake of my canister filter. I would use a valve to reduce the air flow so that it doesn't harm the motor or make my tank look like sprite from all of the bubbles. Thoughts?
There are a few technical things to consider.

1. Canister filters employ impeller pumps. Adding air bubbles into the water stream will make noise at impeller and can potentially reduce pump's service life.

2. The pressure inside canister filter is defined by the height of the water column: from the canister level to the surface level of your tank. If you decide to inject the air into the canister, you will need an air pump that can work against that pressure.

3. Canister filter is sealed and pressurized (see 2) and has to stay sealed and pressurized. If you want to tap in, make sure the connection is air- and watertight.

It is hard to say how big the benefit of all this would be (if any). The nature of air contact in wet-dry filter is significantly different from what you will obtain with injected bubbles. Maybe if you manage to inject a very fine mist of air bubbles into the stream it will work...
 
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