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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have experience with using the CO2art Pro-Series Precision CO2 Check Valve?

I have been using them for a while and they seemed okay. Today, however, I noticed the bubble count for one of my lines go way up. Turns out I had leak coming from the check valve. I haven‘t messed with the line in long time. So, I am assuming the tubing came loose on its own. Now, I am wondering if the rest of my lines with that check valve are leaking to some degree.

With the way the check valve is designed I wonder if leaks are a common problem.
 

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I haven't had any issues with them since installing. I did notice that you have to push it in pass the 1st resistance point (if that makes sense) so the tubing goes in further. I always take a little time to make the cuts on the co2 tubing as square as possible as well. You may want to check your other valves and connections with good old soapy water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought about using soapy water but I was worried if it somehow got into the line and ended up in my tank. I put the tubing and the valve in a pan of water and that’s how I found the leak. I think I will redo all the tubing this weekend.
 

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The type of tubing also came to mind. Are you using actual co2 tubing or airline tubing. I recall an older setup back in the day where I used airline tubing temporarily and it slowly leaked until the co2 tubing was delivered. I would assume you're using tubing for co2, but never hurts to turn over every stone.
 

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I had found the CO2 tubing really stiff and difficult to attach. So instead of the hot water trick I used the extremely hot water trick, basically I almost boiled in the microwave then soaked the ends of the tubing. It went on far easier that way.

And I wouldn't worry about the soap water. If you have a leak it will blow, not suck. And once you've leak checked you can spray it down liberally with clean water to rinse any residue off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@ A modest aquarist, I am using tubing made for co2.
@ NotThePaint, yeah I probably didn’t have to worry about it.

Are you guys just leaving the valve alone after you install it? One of the features of using this type of valve, though I haven’t been utilizing it, seems to be the ease of which the line comes out. It seems it would be easier to separate the line from the valve, than pulling the line off my bubble counters. Making it easier to add water to the counter when needed.
 

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@ A modest aquarist, I am using tubing made for co2.
@ NotThePaint, yeah I probably didn’t have to worry about it.

Are you guys just leaving the valve alone after you install it? One of the features of using this type of valve, though I haven’t been utilizing it, seems to be the ease of which the line comes out. It seems it would be easier to separate the line from the valve, than pulling the line off my bubble counters. Making it easier to add water to the counter when needed.
Hi Marex, I’m using the Pro Elite version and a bit confused by your questions, possibly because of the minor differences in the bits associated with each package...
You mentioned “I noticed the bubble count for one of my lines go way up”. Does this mean you are running more than one line from the manifold via splits in the line? I considered this and settled on the Elite series specifically because this can better be achieved by adding additional manifolds for additional lines - making it virtually fool proof.
Also, “Now, I am wondering if the rest of my lines with that check valve are leaking to some degree.” Is this an external (additional) check valve? Again - with my unit the bubble counter has an integrated check valve built in. I started out with an extra CV right up at the connection to my in-line diffuser but had headaches similar to what you described. I’ve since removed the CV and have had no issues.
“With the way the check valve is designed I wonder if leaks are a common problem.” IMO the designs aren’t the issue as much as the quality of materials and manufacturing...these things are notorious for being defective and can cause considerable damage when they do fail. Unfortunately their website does not show enough detail to determine whether yours has the built in CV, but if it does - I’d recommend ditching the extra one.
And finally, there are a couple of fine o-ring seals on these bubble counters - one under the cap of the CV and the other at the manifold junction. I’ve learned through experience that if one is absent or not properly seated - you’re going to get the kind of issues you mentioned.
All said though, I’ve got mine dialed in and very happy with product. And a final consideration would be to reach out to them directly, their customer service is EXCELLENT!
Cheers and best of luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I have a Pro-Elite Series regulator from co2art as well and I’m running three lines off of it, each with their own bubble counter.


I also have a Pro-Series Precision CO2 check valve installed higher up on each line. What I noticed was that one of my lines was running at a higher bubble count for what I had it set at. Turned out this was because there was a co2 leak that developed where where tube met the Pro-Series Precision check valve.

I’m using the regulator on two 7 gallon tanks and a 10 gallon. I don‘t think the regulator has enough working pressure to use with a set of larger tanks. The working pressure on my regulator barely gets to 40psi. When I emailed customer support about the pressure, because I couldn’t find a number to reach them at, they eventually told me to take the regulator apart by twisting off the knob. I tried and told them the knob is not coming off and I was afraid if I put anymore pressure on it something would break. I was told to try again but I was pretty sure it would not come off unless I snapped it off. Turned out I was correct. Lucky, I found out by seaching the internet instead of breaking the regulator.

I ended up getting another person from CO2art who told me how I was supposed to take the regulator apart. After dealing with them the first time though, I didn‘t feel like trying it. I was considering to return it but since I had enough pressure for my setup I decided to just deal with. Mind you though, no one from their customer support once suggested I return it for another one though I just bought it. As a customer, I sort of expect what I purchase to work as advertised, instead of having to taking it apart and troubleshoot it myself so that it does.

[Edit: cleaned up some typos.]
 

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So now I’m confused. I have the Co2Art Pro Elite kit as well, and I asked in the Co2Art section of Planted Tank about installing an inline check valve and never got an answer. I don’t think I realized that the bubble counter has a built in one, so I went ahead and added an inline one, but I would prefer it if it wasn’t there.
Seems that some people add one and some don’t - redundancy? Does really it matter one way or another?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It is redundant and if the check valve on your bubble counter fails the rest doesn‘t matter, sort of.

Some people will place a check valve closer to the diffuser. So, if water gets into the line the CO2 does not have a long way to push it back in to the tank. My longest line is around 3 and half feet. To be honest I don’t how long it would take to push that water back out if it were to happen. I would imagine I’m just saving my self a few minutes from after my CO2 turns on. So, its probably not necessary for that purpose alone.

However, I don’t know if you would want fertilized tank water mixing with the fluid in your bubble counter either. To prevent any possible mineral build up and preserve the life of the counter. I use distilled water to fill my bubble counter.

To your point though it may not be necessary at all, and like Braddo pointed out to not have it would be saving yourself from potential CO2 leaks.
 

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So now I’m confused. I have the Co2Art Pro Elite kit as well, and I asked in the Co2Art section of Planted Tank about installing an inline check valve and never got an answer. I don’t think I realized that the bubble counter has a built in one, so I went ahead and added an inline one, but I would prefer it if it wasn’t there.
Seems that some people add one and some don’t - redundancy? Does really it matter one way or another?
I hear you Ci - I was confused before and most probably will remain such, but that’s ok; and I agree that it ultimately becomes a personal opinion, I’ve done it several ways but in my case I’m running without an external cv. I’ve had a number of technical issues getting my inline diffuser up and running effectively and it took a lot of deductive reasoning and experimentation to determine this. I am using a 200gph inline pump connected to my diffuser going into the tank. When I originally set it all up, I watched a number of YouTube videos as recommended by co2art and did not install any cv. Things were running great, but then I decided to replace the pump...and that’s where it went wonky. After doing this, I started having water backfill in the line and wasn’t getting my co2 levels as per the norm. After significant research I decided to add a cv - which I got from co2art as a recommendation, but to no success. To add insult to injury, things had gone so awry that I thought there was a leak somewhere. Long story short - I took it all apart, started from square 1, re-visited the videos, and put it back they way I had originally in the first instance. And finally...Success!!! My two deductions as a result were that I did not need the ‘extra’ check valve, and my original issue with back flow occurred because of the way I reconnected the line to the diffuser the second time. Just to be sure I’m not seeing things, I checked the website again for the info regarding the built in check valve that’s part of the bubble counter we all appear to have...
1026889


It is redundant and if the check valve on your bubble counter fails the rest doesn‘t matter, sort of.

Some people will place a check valve closer to the diffuser. So, if water gets into the line the CO2 does not have a long way to push it back in to the tank. My longest line is around 3 and half feet. To be honest I don’t how long it would take to push that water back out if it were to happen. I would imagine I’m just saving my self a few minutes from after my CO2 turns on. So, its probably not necessary for that purpose alone.

However, I don’t know if you would want fertilized tank water mixing with the fluid in your bubble counter either. To prevent any possible mineral build up and preserve the life of the counter. I use distilled water to fill my bubble counter.

To your point though it may not be necessary at all, and like Braddo pointed out to not have it would be saving yourself from potential CO2 leaks.
Understood. I’d be less than enchanted myself with that kind of response, I’m surprised at their response to you. Understanding what you’ve said, the issue is simply that it is a defective unit...no!?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Understood. I’d be less than enchanted myself with that kind of response, I’m surprised at their response to you. Understanding what you’ve said, the issue is simply that it is a defective unit...no!?
As far as the check valve is concerned? Maybe I installed it wrong? However, I haven’t touched my CO2 setup since last month and the bubble count had appeared steady until recently. I have had this set up for a few months now and I have not noticed this issue before either.

I wonder if as pressure builds up in the line it can slowly push out the tube from the check valve. So, I was asking to see if other people have had a similar experience with this valve.

By the way, the reason why I had to touch my regulator setup last month was because no CO2 was coming out. So, I detached the bubble counters from the regulator and removed the regulator from the CO2 tank in order to troubleshoot it. Turned out the solenoid valve was getting stuck in the closed position even though it was getting power. Needless to say, my experience with CO2art products has not been the best.

After recutting all the lines and putting everything back together again, I found that one of the check valves still produces a small leak. It took a while for a bubble to form but it was there. So, the issue may simply be due to a defective unit.
 
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