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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well title says it all, walked into a tank with fish floating around or in awkward spots upside down....

Lost a few dither fish, but three discus are breathing... but in bad shape.

I cut co2 fast as hell and then changed out a [censored][censored][censored][censored] ton of water (water PH and source are same thank god) still not out of the wood. have them netted near surface with a bunch of surface agitation.

what do i do now? pray i suppose :crying:


EDIT: scientific equivalent for censored amount of water (sorry admins) = 50-70%
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
stopped changing water when the rasbora that survived came to and seemed normal.

2 of the 3 might make it, but its the jv im worried about ~3 in and not attempting to swim much yet... Dont know how long they were gassed for - tank is well planted and is probably why they arent dead already...

still netted in current
:crying:

Bump: thanks MC I am - can hear the air from 20+ feet away
 

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Pretty much did all you can, so good work on thinking/acting fast.

Just leave co2 off. More surface agitation for more dissolved oxygen and off gas co2 quicker. Water changes also help with reducing co2 concentrations, and can potentially bring in more dissolved oxygen. Cooler temperature water holds more dissolved oxygen (remember they are water warm fish though).
Though be cautious with sudden cooler temps and lots of surface agitation, as those can induce more stress/shock on the already stunned/stressed fish.

I would keep the lights off just to keep stress minimal.
Careful with them being netted too. It's good that they are near the water surface, but the surface agitation and the net restricting movement can induce more stress. Too much stress can lead to death.

There are other oxidizers, but I would not recommend those.

Since it's just lack of oxygen in the blood (from the co2), they should recover pretty quickly (if they are going to make it. If they were staying upright by their own will, they should survive easily), though they may be disoriented and stressed for a few hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Pretty much did all you can, so good work on thinking/acting fast.

Just leave co2 off. More surface agitation for more dissolved oxygen and off gas co2 quicker. Water changes also help with reducing co2 concentrations, and can potentially bring in more dissolved oxygen. Cooler temperature water holds more dissolved oxygen (remember they are water warm fish though).
Though be cautious with sudden cooler temps and lots of surface agitation, as those can induce more stress/shock on the already stunned/stressed fish.

I would keep the lights off just to keep stress minimal.
Careful with them being netted too. It's good that they are near the water surface, but the surface agitation and the net restricting movement can induce more stress. Too much stress can lead to death.

There are other oxidizers, but I would not recommend those.

Since it's just lack of oxygen in the blood (from the co2), they should recover pretty quickly, though they may be disoriented and stressed for a few hours.
Did my best to keep temp similar... the thermo amazing says its still 82 in there but feels cooler.

Recommend getting them out of current and agitation?? Seems like it - but its a 6 in breeder net
 

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Did my best to keep temp similar... the thermo amazing says its still 82 in there but feels cooler.

Recommend getting them out of current and agitation?? Seems like it - but its a 6 in breeder net
I've had a Arowana that had jumped out the tank and was nearly dead by the time I came home to find him (super dry, eyes dried up and sunk in, almost no movement/fight left in him, barely took any breaths) but I put him back in the tank and held a airstone under his gills. I think the stress of higher flow/current/surface agitation is less worrysome than getting enough oxygen into the fish. So proceed with getting the Discus plenty of oxygen.

The breeder box should break up the surface agitation enough to reduce stress somewhat. The box is good, I was thinking you were just using fish nets (which wouldn't provide much room for the fish to stay upright without being entangled).

Carry on. You have done well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay the 2 big guys were able to swim out of the breeder on their own... the 3rd ( and unfortanely wifes favorite...) is still on the line... have him slight near the stone's agitation but out of the stronger portion of the current.

Bump: again greatly appreciate the help! did that arowanna make it?!!
 

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The Arowana sure did make it! Still alive till this day (though I rehomed to a friend that is able to keep much larger tanks at his house (300 gallon and 600 gallon). No signs of any brain or sight damage either! Really smart arowana with a ton of personality (I've had quite a few Aros in my time)
 

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Oxygen, oxygen, oxygen. As you are finding out is the best answer. I've had several gasping incidents over thirty+ years of fishkeeping, and the easy and reliable answer to gasping is increase oxygen.
Just so it's know, co2 does not displace oxygen. You can have high levels of dissolved oxygen, and fish can still die from high levels of dissolved co2.

I explained how this works in this post
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/8...-fish-build-up-tolerance-co2.html#post8806105

In short, too much co2 makes it so the fish's blood cannot carry oxygen, even if there is plenty of oxygen in the water (similar to nitrite poisoning).
So the most important thing is to degas the co2 from the water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
so most things seemed to have returned to normal, aside from the massive stress.

That Juvie is still not in good shape. When I pull this guy from the current and higher oxygenation?

I am continuing to agitate and degas - but for how long?
 

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If I have expensive fish, I'd go low-tech. No CO2.
CO2 Overdosing happens to everybody. Sometimes you get lucky and no one dies. Too much CO2 is a thing (kills) even with lots of O2. The quickest resolution is to change the water to remove most of the CO2.
 

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Just so it's know, co2 does not displace oxygen. You can have high levels of dissolved oxygen, and fish can still die from high levels of dissolved co2.

I explained how this works in this post
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/8...-fish-build-up-tolerance-co2.html#post8806105

In short, too much co2 makes it so the fish's blood cannot carry oxygen, even if there is plenty of oxygen in the water (similar to nitrite poisoning).
So the most important thing is to degas the co2 from the water.
Thanks for the clarification. For the record, I never had a setup where I added CO2, so my experience is just with a lack of. O2.

And to Aqua Jon, glad to hear things have more or less settled down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
so most things seemed to have returned to normal, aside from the massive stress.

That Juvie is still not in good shape. When I pull this guy from the current and higher oxygenation?

I am continuing to agitate and degas - but for how long?
Still hoping to get these questions answered, if anyone minds. Thanks for the help up until now - exceptional response time too!
 

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It really doesn't take long to get co2 and o2 levels proper in the tank, though it may take a few hours for fish to recuperate depending how badly effected they were.

Being pretty much two hours, you've done about as much as you can do. The fish will just need time to recover if it will.

Dissolved co2 should be low and dissolved oxygen levels should be plenty by now. You can return surface agitation to normal, just leave co2 off. Since the levels are good now, the next thing to focus on is stress. Minimize as much stress as possible for the fish to have as best chance at recovery as possible. Leave the lights off. Keep the water pristine. Too much water current and turbulence (from outflow and airstones) for fish that aren't used to it, can cause more stress on them (was needed at the time to degas and oxygenate), so it is a good idea to return things to normal since the levels should be fine by now.

If the juvi Discus is too weak to stay upright, I would probably keep it in the breeder net if it helps keep it in the correct upright position and keep it from being blown/tumbling all over the tank (don't put it directly in the path of the filter outflow though so it doesn't have to fight the current). If the juvi can stay upright on it's own and looks more stressed from not being with it's Discus friends/family, allow it to go with the others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've used a mag float to pin the breeder on its side with the now reduced current flowing into the net. He has perked up and began to swim upright a bit within the breeder net. I agree that he was suffering from the current and agitation. I think he will survive :grin2:
Of course i think 2 weeks time will tell how all the fish deal with the PTSD.
 

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I've had a Arowana that had jumped out the tank and was nearly dead by the time I came home to find him (super dry, eyes dried up and sunk in, almost no movement/fight left in him, barely took any breaths) but I put him back in the tank and held a airstone under his gills. I think the stress of higher flow/current/surface agitation is less worrysome than getting enough oxygen into the fish. So proceed with getting the Discus plenty of oxygen.

The breeder box should break up the surface agitation enough to reduce stress somewhat. The box is good, I was thinking you were just using fish nets (which wouldn't provide much room for the fish to stay upright without being entangled).

Carry on. You have done well.

Some people may not know this, but you can sometimes revive fish that jumped out of a tank and looks all stiff and dried up on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
just a note for any future readers - I believe this began because I had not been running CO2 in the tank for about a week. The cylinder went dry and I had been exceptionally busy and could not get it filled until today. I saw a youtube video with someone describing the same issue where water backs into the lines (up to your checks) and then changes the pressure output into your tank. Not sure exactly how that works, but lesson learned - dont start a new cylinder (and mess with your settings) when you change out CO2 after lines filling with water, unless you are on watch all day or have a pH controller.
 
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