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Hey folks, I'm trying to brainstorm a way to get more oxygen, consistently and measurably, in my tank. I remember seeing a unit in my lfs in Eugene when I loved there that was a small metal disk that generated oxygen (and probably hydrogen as well). The bubbles were so small it looked like smoke comming from the generator. I like equipment as a sort of curiosity in my tank and this one was pretty cool to watch.

I'd like to find this piece of equipment if anyone has a link. I remember the lad that ran thier planted displays swore by it for reducing algae in CO2 supplemented tanks. I'm having a problem with BBA and thought I would give it a try to reduce DOC by giving some competition on the oxygen side of the bacteria house. Unfortunately my water levels change quickly in the high altitude and desert where I live now and I don't enjoy the giant bubbles or noise of an airstone.

Thanks tank folks!
 

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You can increase the oxygen content of your tank by simply pointing some of your filter returns towards the surface of you aquarium.....surface skimmers work, too

The extra flow at the surface promotes gas exchange between the tank and the air in the room it's in and should draw in oxygen
 

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Follow @rzn7z7’s advice. Skimmers, and other means of surface agitation, are the best way to increase gas exchange (air stones don’t do much). Look to other causes for the BBA issues. Below, is something I’ve posted elsewhere, but it will give you a relative means to measure O2 levels.

The solubility limit of oxygen (presuming an average atmospheric pressure in NA) in water that is 78 degrees F is about 8ppm (colder water has higher solubility). This is much lower than the solubility of CO2 and, fortunately, they are independent of each other (CO2 doesn’t displace O2 and vice versa).

Although it is hard to compare expectations for O2 levels between tanks, because there are so many variables that can affect it, particularly varying degrees of bio-demand by flora (which includes bacteria) and fauna, below is my experience with the Salifert O2 test kit. My 29-gal has a surface area that is about 7% of the total volume, which affects the speed of gas exchange. My canister filter return is completely underwater, so the only agitation is created by a small surface skimmer, which makes it easy to test gas exchange. I have a very heavy fish load and a large, healthy plant mass.

I do not know how to get at a good calibration for oxygen tests without spending a lot of money, so I use it as reference indicator to other readings on this one tank, similar to how a TDS meter would be used. My Salifert kit reads 12ppm for degassed water. I take this to mean that a Salifert 12ppm indicated level is actually 8ppm (maximum saturation). When I run the skimmer, I reach the 8ppm (Salifert 12ppm) level in my tank and it holds day and night, despite significant O2 changes due to photosynthesis cycles. Thus, it proves, to me, that the skimmer makes a big difference.

When I shut my skimmer off, during the day at maximum photosynthesis, the Salifert reading drops to 8ppm after about four hours, despite the heavy photosynthesis (which can add more O2 than the gas exchange process). I assume that the Salifert 8ppm means an absolute change from the 12ppm vs. a relative change, so I take it as an actual ppm level of about 4ppm (8ppm actual - 4ppm actual) and I see my fish struggling at the surface. My fish load clearly consumes large quantities (relative to saturation levels) of oxygen. When I turn the skimmer back on, O2 returns to the Salifert 12ppm and fish behavior returns to normal. Additionally, when the skimmer is off for a few hours, pH drops by half a point, indicating that CO2 is building (this may further cause fish to struggle). A few hours after the skimmer is turned on again, pH rises to it’s previous level.

Too much oxygen (supersaturation) can stress fish (gas bubble disease, where you can see tiny bubbles on fish. It’s like the “bends” in humans), but this is hard to do. O2 levels can be pushed past the normal solubility limit with quick temperature increases or very rapid photosynthesis with lots of plants and/or a sudden algae bloom.
 

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Hey folks, I'm trying to brainstorm a way to get more oxygen, consistently and measurably, in my tank. I remember seeing a unit in my lfs in Eugene when I loved there that was a small metal disk that generated oxygen (and probably hydrogen as well). The bubbles were so small it looked like smoke comming from the generator. I like equipment as a sort of curiosity in my tank and this one was pretty cool to watch.

I'd like to find this piece of equipment if anyone has a link. I remember the lad that ran thier planted displays swore by it for reducing algae in CO2 supplemented tanks. I'm having a problem with BBA and thought I would give it a try to reduce DOC by giving some competition on the oxygen side of the bacteria house. Unfortunately my water levels change quickly in the high altitude and desert where I live now and I don't enjoy the giant bubbles or noise of an airstone.

Thanks tank folks!
Are you sure you weren't seeing a CO2 diffuser?
 

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Are you sure you weren't seeing a CO2 diffuser?
They are referring to things like this:
 
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Hey folks, I'm trying to brainstorm a way to get more oxygen, consistently and measurably, in my tank. I remember seeing a unit in my lfs in Eugene when I loved there that was a small metal disk that generated oxygen (and probably hydrogen as well). The bubbles were so small it looked like smoke comming from the generator. I like equipment as a sort of curiosity in my tank and this one was pretty cool to watch.

I'd like to find this piece of equipment if anyone has a link. I remember the lad that ran thier planted displays swore by it for reducing algae in CO2 supplemented tanks. I'm having a problem with BBA and thought I would give it a try to reduce DOC by giving some competition on the oxygen side of the bacteria house. Unfortunately my water levels change quickly in the high altitude and desert where I live now and I don't enjoy the giant bubbles or noise of an airstone.

Thanks tank folks!
I think you might be referring to the Twinstar reactor algae scrubber... It basically creates micro oxygen bubbles with electrolysis...

1032308
 

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Just get a air pump it’s a way cheaper option
But, from everything I've read it only adds oxygen by breaking the surface for gas exchange. Redirecting the filter flow can accomplish the same thing without the extra noise and equipment.
 

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Yes but you get the benefit of filtration and noise can be removed if you use a air stone inside your air pump
 

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I didn’t say a air stone alone ,I said inside the air pump/sponge filter
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think you might be referring to the Twinstar reactor algae scrubber... It basically creates micro oxygen bubbles with electrolysis...

View attachment 1032308
That's the one, thanks a bunch Bucetrap. It really is a nice looking cloud and I always enjoy those sort of hypnotic effects. Besides that, I've seen first hand the tanks that were running them and it really does work. If anyone visits Aquaserene in Eugene, you'll see what I mean.

Thanks for all of the other responses everyone. I am just not a fan of airstones and I cannot get consistent surface agitation. I am also using lids on my 75 so I wonder how much regular air is displaced by the CO2 off gassing at the surface anyways. This way I'm sure I am getting pure O2 and believe it or not, available hydrogen is actually something I'm surprised is not investigated more.
 

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Glad I could help (y)

I almost got one myself for algae inhibitor in my 75g… I went with a UV sterilizer instead to keep a balanced gas exchange. These twinstar reactors are like low dosing hydrogen peroxide from what I read about them. I know Green Aqua in the UK uses them in some of their tanks and they work great.
 
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