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Ehiem 2213 good for starting?

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A friend just gave me a 46 G bow front tank including the cabinet and a EHEIM 2213 filter with media.
I want to grow this into a planted tank .
Q: is this filter enough for 46 G
according to the eheim it should be but many people in this forum are saying it is not enough. should I get a more powerful to start.
Thanks
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Well, are you planning to stock light or heavy?

For biofiltration you probably will be ok since plants will also act as bio filtration. But you will eventually want more flow for planted tank. But since you already have the filter, I would use that and add powerheads for water movement. That would be way cheaper than getting another cannister.
 

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I run a 2213 on my nano (11G) and consider it about the right amount of flow to get the (injected) CO2 concentration even throughout the tank with no dead spots.

If I was running a dirted tank, or a simple heavily planted low tech where plants provide most of the filtration, I'd consider the 2213 suitable for up to 30G.

A 2215 should suffice for low tech at that size. If you plan on running CO2 I'd go a 2217. Powerheads are great at creating flow and moving injected CO2 around, and technically you could have a smaller filter, but you may get sick of the space the powerhead takes up within the tank. You'll find that you regret not just buying a bigger filter in the end to move equipment out of the tank... You'll kick yourself for not going with a bigger filter from the start....
 

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I find this is another case of there being no one firm answer as so much depends on what and how we each run our tank. Lots of décor and the flow may need adjustment---or not. So since you have the filter and know how to get another, it seems logical to me to go with the filter and see how YOUR tank runs. How my tank runs really doesn't matter?
You may find the CO2 is not good enough and want to add a powerhead. I find them far more agreeable than another filter. They are easy to hide, easy to clean and easy to buy if just water moving is all you need. You may need more but that is almost always a work in progress for me. I can't say how my tank will work until I start adding things.
Save your money until you know much more about the tank in maybe six months. Why guess with little info when you will be better prepared later? It will give you an interesting project to research!
 

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Save your money until you know much more about the tank in maybe six months. Why guess with little info when you will be better prepared later? It will give you an interesting project to research!
I think I will go this way ( thanks PlantedRich and the others too)
I dont want to spend a lot a money if not needed.
Some details ans some questions .
I plan to use finnex 24-7 Amazon.com : Finnex Planted+ 24/7 Fully Automated Aquarium LED, Controller, 30 Inch : Pet Supplies
It produces a lot of light for my project and then use common plants that live with this light . eventually I will add some CO2

I still keep having more questions .
Why do you need to move so much the water? I mean I know that you have to recycle all the water in an even way(vs only a section of the tank) but the movement I see with this filter seems a lot .
Isnt that movement bad for plants? like they can be unrooted and soil will be disturbed?
If using CO2 ... Co2 will be disolved in the water and since the tank is been mixed constantly why to use more movement in the water
Thanks
 

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I use far less water movement than some but I also use far fewer plants as I have lots of big fish. I keep African cichlids with a few strays of this and that mixed in so my needs/wants are different than someone keeping different fish. When I had large volumes of plants, the fish adapted well enough, with the mbuna staying down and around the rocks as they normally would and the large open water folks staying up above much of the time. The fish were fine but I was not. I felt it looked crowded to see a large fish moving through the red tiger lotus. At feeding, everybody wanted to be first so the top got crowded and at spawning time, there had to be room made for those who wanted to have a site ready. But the fish and plants were more adaptable than I felt looked right.
I felt the flow was plenty to move CO2 around and I've never really had a tank that didn't have a certain number of dead spots around and under rocks and wood. In theory, it would be nice to have all the debris move to the filters but in reality, I never really expect it and just learned to ignore some debris. I like a natural look and debris is the norm in nature, so I go with it in my tank.
But then there are those who have small plants and carpets which may be much more uniform without a lot of obstructions. Those may require a bit different setup and keeping debris moving may be a higher priority.
Part of the question may also be the way the CO2 is dispersed with different diffusers. A single outlet shooting out a stream of bubbles might easily give the impression that the same amount of CO2 is not getting to the far corner without more powerheads to move the bubbles.
I see no wrong answer but neither do I see a right answer for all tanks.
Shoot for perfect but expect to adjust as needed is the way my tanks run.

Too thick? And adjusted?
 
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