The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just rescaped my 75G tank. Flourite/Eco Complete substrate, low to medium light, Thrive EI dosing. No CO2 but the parts should be here in about 2 weeks.

My tank had been a wreck, strong nutrient deficiency. I started dosing with Thrive capsules just yesterday. I've been cautioned to go slow with them and I want to do that.

I want to start a carpet of Echinodorus tenellus, I can get that locally and I can avoid winter shipping hassles. I have not placed any of the Thrive capsules in the front of the tank where the Echinodorus tenellus would go.

I got to thinking, I can dry start it in a 10 gallon tank with orgainic potting soil. Let it grow up a few months and then transfer. This seems to have a several advantages. 1) My LFS only has 2 of them so that's all I can buy locally.
2) The nutrient rich potting soil will give them what they need that they won't get in the 75G tank.

But, since they'll be grow emersed, won't I just be subjecting them to trauma when I plant them later? Would it make more sense to flood the 10 gallon now and also dose the water column? I have all the extra parts I need, so the only extra expense is really just a bag of soils.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
if they were grown submersed before, they may take some time to adapt to the emersed conditions.

I dry-started mine. HC and Eleocharis did great. Echinodorus tenellus did not. Same conditions for all. so it may depend on the species too.

btw, I think it's good to leave some opening in the cover to promote gas exchanges.
I found misting everyday is good. Otherwise, they will get burned but I'm using sun as light.

If it's not working why not submerge it?

hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
My experience with echinodorus tenellus has been that is spreads pretty dang fast submerged. Mother plants will form multiple runners, and then the new plant lets start sending runners after a few more weeks. It takes a few weeks to get rooted in good, and then starts sending runners like mad, basically like really short vallisnaria.

If the tank is already full of water, I would just pop it in around the middle of the area you want so you can direct the runners to fill in the areas you intend to cover. That worked for me when I used it in my 20g, and in about 4 months I was taking surplus platelets to my LFS for trade credit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,909 Posts
From what you posted you are planning to inject co2 in the near future? If so dry start has little benefit for you compared to if you were planning to keep your tank low tech. I would plant them where you want them to be and run the co2 when it comes.

Additionally in my experience plants do not take well to transplanting out of dirt and into aquariums. The roots grow crazy in dirt and getting that dirt out of them is very traumatic to the plant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Something a little off-the-wall, but maybe a consdieration: If you want to start off the plants in something smaller, to encourage faster growth without risking an algal bloom in your tank, you could set up a "mock dry-start" situation, but have it completely flooded. So, smaller container, nutrient-rich soil (cap with some thin layer of sand/gravel/etc.), and get then growing. Then, once they have multiplied, transplant to your main tank.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top