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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, now that I'm down to 2 adult OEBTs (will be one probably within 48 hours) I'm pretty much wanting to tear the tank down and start over in the next few weeks. New substrate, though I'll keep the plants, they'll just go through a heavy PP soak. I know some folks bleach the tank etc but my problem is, this is a 12g long...not necessarily heavy, but quite unwieldy at 36" long. What would be the easiest way to either bleach or vinegar the tank and rinse? Taking it outside and hosing it would be easiest but the risk of smacking it into something and breaking it makes me nervous. I've got a few ideas in my head but figure someone on here probably has a SUPER easy way that's just not crossing my mind. Also, I have an Eheim canister on the tank. Should I replace all biomedia and sponges with new or just give them a good rinse instead of wiping out all of the good bacteria? The tank will either house tibees or CRS after the teardown. Not sure how susceptible they'll be to whatever bacteria wiped out my OEBTs. I've got Supremes living in there just fine but know they aren't susceptible to the same bacterias or are just more hardy in general. Wasn't sure about CRS or tibees.
 

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"Easiest way to tear down tank (after bacterial infection)"

Sledge hammer? :p

I'd imagine a 10% bleach solution is good enough to wipe out just about any bacteria.

I know some people use vinegar instead and just rinse that off.

I'd like to hear other suggestions to answer these and the rest of your questions as well. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bryce I normally use vinegar on everything. Plus it's easy as heck to rinse off (unlike bleach in my experience). But again, just not positive in this case. Doing both wouldn't be a bad idea I would imagine. It's the size and shape of the tank that's throwing me. Not sure if the easiest would be filling it with water and then siphoning it with a long hose, say, to the bathroom sink or something or what.
 

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Vinegar would be the better choice from the standpoint of eliminating or minimizing the risk of residuals.

What I'm not sure about is whether vinegar can effectively kill whichever bacterial infection your tank suffered from. I'm assuming enough vinegar will kill just about anything...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Vinegar would be the better choice from the standpoint of eliminating or minimizing the risk of residuals.

What I'm not sure about is whether vinegar can effectively kill whichever bacterial infection your tank suffered from. I'm assuming enough vinegar will kill just about anything...
THIS is exactly what I'm wondering. I think it's safer residual wise...just not sure if it would kill everything that needs killing.
 

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If you want to completely start over? Use bleach and then allow the tank to dry completely out.

If you *really* want to clean the filter and eliminate all doubt, you'll have to use bleach there, as well, and start over from scratch.

Otherwise, treating with meds (and I think you've already done that) is the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah treating with meds was what killed a lot of the stock. The Melafix was ok and only lost a few during that time but the Maracyn 'last ditch effort' killed quite a few healthy shrimp...Supremes included. I just did TOO MUCH To the tank...most of the deaths were my fault, no doubt. But time to dust off my rump and try again:) Learn from my mistakes and such.

I'm wanting to replace the whole substrate though for sure. Guess it just makes sense to go ahead and replace all media in the filter to be on the safe side. At least now I have a better handle on cycling a tank and won't monkey with it and screw it up like I did last time. LOL!

Jake, what does 'letting it dry out' do? Does it need to be in the sun drying cause that's a no go. Or can I just let it dry in the tub if I can get it in there? Then rinse it, then fill with heavily dechlorinated water, then rinse some more. Does that sound right?
 

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why does everyone use bleach?
3% H2O2 at anything above 10ml/g kills any bacteria
 

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I thought about it and would have to measure. That would probably be the safest...if I don't whack it against a door on the way. I'm about as graceful as a drunk elephant:icon_redf
The way I've cleaned tanks in a tub is to line the bottom and sides of the bathtub with old towels to cushion against any "oops" moments. Then I take the tank and wrap the outside in bubble wrap and tape it with duct tape. Overkill I know but it's better than cracking a tank!

Then I put the tank into the tub, long side down. I use 100% vinegar and a sponge to clean the inside and let it sit that way for a few minutes. Then carefully turn it to rest on the short side and rinse it with lots of water. Hope everything works out for you!
 

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sticke it in the tub and do a mild bleach soak with boiling water that is what i would do. i know oebt are pretty prone to bacterial infections ive seen so many threads this year about it its not funny. im planning on trying again after the first of the year myself
 

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I think it's likely that your next tank will have some of the same bacteria, if indeed it was bacteria that caused your problem. You have to remember that a fish tank is a seething soup of many, many kinds of bacteria, whether it's healthy or not.

My guess is that if your OEBTs did die from infections, it was because they were under some cultural stress (water quality, temp, whatever) that took a toll on them. Maybe it made them too weak to resist the bacteria.

So my recommendation is to clean as normal, and try to do a better job with your shrimp care next time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It's something in that dang tank. I just had one on her side in her death throes...pulled her out and put her in a cup of clean water (half RO half tap), no acclimation, just plopped in and she uprighted herself and started walking around. Same thing that happened with Ms Thang. I have gutted everything suspect and changed 80% of the water and was still losing them. All that's in there are lava rocks, substrate, and mosses. And a couple of cholla logs. I pulled out all driftwood, all moss walls (on wire mesh), anything suspect. So yeah, time for a redo.
 

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You can let it sit in the tub and dry out if you want. I'd just leave it in place where it is and fill it up / drain it out. Then use a towel or something to dry out most of the remaining water. Then let it air dry for a little bit or over night.

Drying it out just ensures there's no chlorine leftovers. A heavy dose of Prime in some rinse water will also work. But in case you're exhausted after breaking everything down, leaving it overnight will accomplish the same thing.

Jake, what does 'letting it dry out' do? Does it need to be in the sun drying cause that's a no go. Or can I just let it dry in the tub if I can get it in there? Then rinse it, then fill with heavily dechlorinated water, then rinse some more. Does that sound right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The way I've cleaned tanks in a tub is to line the bottom and sides of the bathtub with old towels to cushion against any "oops" moments. Then I take the tank and wrap the outside in bubble wrap and tape it with duct tape. Overkill I know but it's better than cracking a tank!

Then I put the tank into the tub, long side down. I use 100% vinegar and a sponge to clean the inside and let it sit that way for a few minutes. Then carefully turn it to rest on the short side and rinse it with lots of water. Hope everything works out for you!

That's not a bad idea either. At least I've got a few different options now. WHEW!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I think it's likely that your next tank will have some of the same bacteria, if indeed it was bacteria that caused your problem. You have to remember that a fish tank is a seething soup of many, many kinds of bacteria, whether it's healthy or not.

My guess is that if your OEBTs did die from infections, it was because they were under some cultural stress (water quality, temp, whatever) that took a toll on them. Maybe it made them too weak to resist the bacteria.

So my recommendation is to clean as normal, and try to do a better job with your shrimp care next time.

OEBT are simply more prone to bacterial infections. I have other shrimp in that tank that are doing just fine. Params all check out and have since they started dying (which was as soon as I started getting them in pretty much). I've done everything I can for this tank...nothing lacked on my shrimp care, thanks. If anything I did too much trying to ward off the bacterial infections I was seeing and just couldn't get it knocked. If you read my thread 'dying berried OEBT' you'll see that I do everything I can for the little guys. Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I don't. That particular shrimp and her babies are doing fine in that tank right now, but they've only been back in there for a week so I plan on pulling them this week. The same water that has been used in the tank (as far as 50% tap/50% RO...not the same tank water) is what goes into the tupperware container I housed that female in for 7 weeks, who got 100% water changes daily for the first 3 weeks. It's something IN THE TANK killing them.
 
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