The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you feed your dwarf cories? I've been feeding sinking wafers right before lights out, blood worms, tropical flake food, and an occasional algae wafer. I haven't really seen them eat but their bellies look full and they're constantly on the search for food. What do you feed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,820 Posts
Hi malandmatt,

Like you I feed my Corydoras sterbai (std and albino) and my Corydoras aeneus algae wafers, frozen bloodworms, tropical flakes, and freeze dried tubifex worms. The tubifex worms come in dry cubes that can either be smooched against the glass (until the corys rip it off) or in a feeding bell. I like San Francisco Brand tubifex worms because they are sterilized during the manufacturing process so no bacteria or parasites can be transmitted to my fish. Tubifex worms are high in protein and great for conditioning Corydoras for breeding. Of course other species enjoy the worms as well.

DIY feeding bell for FD tubifex worm cubes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,820 Posts
Hi malANDmatt,

Once upon a time (known as the 1960's) in our galaxy there was a company called Miracle Plastics (owned by TFH / the behemoth of the aquarium hobby at the time) that introduced a new fish food - freeze-dried tubifex worms. The freeze-drying process became better known with the beginning of the space program and freeze-dried ford for the astronauts. The advent of freeze-dried fish foods followed. The first freeze-dried foods I recall were tubifex worms and adult brine shrimp; thin sheets of the product were freeze-dried and then cut into small cubes. The foods were very popular because they were high in protein and were not messy like the live counterparts.

However because the freeze-drying process made the cubes very light (no water) the cubes floated and were not easily accessible to the fish. To make the foods available to fish that fed in the mid-range or bottom areas of the aquarium all hobbyists could do was smooch the cubes onto the inside glass; unfortunately the fish attacked the cubes so aggressively that the cubes would become loose from the glass and float to the surface. So Miracle Plastics invented the Miracle Feeding Bell.

Miracle Feeding Bell - note fish pulling worms through the mesh (TFH 1968)


I found using freeze-dried tubifex worms, and the feeding bells, very helpful when conditioning fish for breeding; especially Corydoras species. Unfortunately my last Miracle Feeding Bell 'died' about 5 years ago so I was forced to improvise. I make the feeding bell using the clear plastic mesh canvas sheets used for craft projects. I cut it so I can make a cone; then I use a heat gun to seal the 'seam' of the cone and also to attach a stainless steel washer at the bottom. Lastly I attach fly fishing line to allow me to raise or lower the feeding location in the tank as well as retrieve the feeding bell after feeding.

If the feeding bell is sitting on the bottom the fish pull the worms loose from the freeze-dried cubes through the mesh. If I suspend the feeding bell the fish not only grab the worms through the mesh but smart ones sneak their noses into the bell through the washer and they really feast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,051 Posts
Awesome deal but where's pics of yours??

Sent from my VS985 4G using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
Don't know why this is filed so low in my memory, but it made me think of something else.
A little trick some cory breeders use is to cut the top of a plastic cooldrink bottle and float that in the top of the tank.
For some reason many species like to "hide" their eggs by laying them on the smooth plastic floater.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
That ad is from 1968 I think it says. I'm not 100% positive but I dont think those are blood parrots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,862 Posts
If I am not mistaken, blood parrots are hybrids. I don't think those are "non-deformed" blood parrots either, I still think the whole head/body shape would be pretty different, but I'm not a cichlid guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
Being an ancient aquarist, it's a blessing, and a curse. :tongue:
Speaking for myself I can assure you having veteran aquarist such as yourself on the forum is indeed a blessing for us.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top