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I have a 30 gallon shrimp tank that duckweed loves and the baby shrimp <1/4" love the duckweed. I need to remove some of this duckweed but when I jostle it baby shrimp drop out of it but immediately return to it. Any ideas how I can remove the duckweed without removing the baby shrimp. Alternatively, any tips for duckweed control.

Thanks, Al
 

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For floating plants, I remove some floaters with every water change.


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Other than physically remove them, I don’t know of any chemical or biological control of duckweed. But if your shrimplets love duckweed, why remove it as you remove also food and habitat for shrimplets.
 

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You could get airline hose and create a "barrier" to attempt to keep the duckweed together.... or there's barriers that use SS mesh and a couple of suction cups.


I just removed a bunch of frogbit from my tank. I shook the plants first prior to pulling them out, then snipped the roots and had everything back in water. Did not see any offspring in the plants that I took out... then again, I also didn't try too hard to look for them. While removing the plants, it looked like there was a lot of debris in the tank. That was all the offspring swimming around.
 

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how I remove is I will not feed the tank for a few days then overfeed in the corner of the tank or somewhere far away from the top and wait for the shrimpies to swarm the food. once I feel confident that most of the colony is pigging away I will take my shock vacc and carefully suck all the duckweed off the surface of the water. that's the one thing with shrimp thanks is that the babies sometimes get sucked up. I just say do your best not trying to get the babies but sometimes casualties happen.
 

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Duckweed is evil, imo. Sure, it's a great nutrient suck and certain creatures may enjoy it, but it gets everywhere, reproduces too quickly, and is very difficult to remove completely. There are better low maintenance and low light floating plant options.

Manually remove as much as you can (as safely as possible), and mist the remnants daily (lightly) with peroxide. Keep doing this until last plantlet is gone. Replace with Frogbit, Salvinia, Dwarf Water lettuce, or maybe even greater duckweed.
 

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Another approach is to edge them out with a preferred species. I got some water spangles (I think Salvinia Minima) and they have, to a degree, edged out the duckweed. I still have the duckweed but far less than I had in the past and didn't have to remove any of it. Of course my entire surface is filled, if I had any empty space, I'm sure one or the other would quickly fill it.
 

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Another approach is to edge them out with a preferred species. I got some water spangles (I think Salvinia Minima) and they have, to a degree, edged out the duckweed. I still have the duckweed but far less than I had in the past and didn't have to remove any of it. Of course my entire surface is filled, if I had any empty space, I'm sure one or the other would quickly fill it.
No plants can edge out duckweed. I have Salvinia Minima, frogbit, and water lettuce, all have duckweed contamination. You can try physical removal, barrier, rinsing or whatever, it will return if you miss just one tiny piece.
 

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Any ideas how I can remove the duckweed without removing the baby shrimp.
Hi Al,

Not easy is it!. I have salvinia minima that grows fast in my tanks. Removed a load the other week with reasonable jiggling to knock off any adult shrimp, but then discovered tiny shrimplets in the tank the next day. Hoping I didn't inadvertently bin anyway with the plants! :crying:

Best plan is to jiggle as best you can, but then put the plants in a bowl or bucket (white colour is best) so you can do round #2 of jiggling and inspection before finally disposing of the plants.

If you can ever completely get rid of the duckweed then I would second salvinia minima as a great floating plant for shrimp tanks. Some shrimp love to eat it (my Amano) whilst neo's (especially my Goldenbacks) love to graze hanging upside down below it. Grows pretty fast, great for sucking up nitrates, but easy enough to control.

Have fun :)
James
 

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I generally remove it with a net during water changes into a 5 gallon bucket, filled about halfway. Then I "shake out" the duckweed in the bucket and pour any shrimplets back in the tank. I might still compost a few, but it's the best method I've found.
 

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I spoon it into a 2lt bowl of changed water, spoon back any hitchhikers then net out the weed from the bowl, repeat until the tank is thinned out enough (then empty the net into my pond as my golden rudd seem to have developed a taste for duckweed)
 
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