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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I am currently in roughly week 2 of my DSM. The HC (dwarf baby tears) have taken exceptional hold and growth so far, as well as the S. repens. I would like to use the yogurt + moss DSM on my spider wood, but I have been battling white mold growth on it since almost day 1 (speckled, fuzzy). I swab with 6% salon grade H2O2 and it keeps it at bay for a while. However, I know that once I purposely keep it moist with the addition of yogurt, there will likely be an explosion of mold. I don’t want it to affect my other plants/the moss itself.

Most yogurt DSMs I see are on rocks. It seems spider wood is notorious for molding. To remove it from the tank for the DSM process with moss would mostly disrupt the way the dragon stones are placed, so I’d rather keep it in tact. But I suppose if there is no other choice, I can make do.

Any recommendations for this situation? I plan to use Fissidens fontanus.

Tank specs:
8.8 gallon
Fluval 3.0 22w Plant Spectrum LED (timer set for 12 hours per day)
Fluval stratum
Misting mixture: water & Thrive+ fertilizer
10 root tabs throughout substrate
Spider wood + Dragon stone
Hemianthus callitrichoides
Eleocharis belem
Microcarpaea minima merrill
Staurogyne repens

(Plan to add: Fissidens fontanus, Hemianthus micranthemoides)
 

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I've seen people add springtails which are very small isopods that love to eat mold and will clear it up for you. It's a trick people use for terrariums and can be applied to the dry start method. You can buy them online, and when the time comes to fill up with water, they will be on the surface and you can syphon them out. Here's a video of Jurijs Jutjajevs working on a dry start where he uses them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've seen people add springtails which are very small isopods that love to eat mold and will clear it up for you. It's a trick people use for terrariums and can be applied to the dry start method. You can buy them online, and when the time comes to fill up with water, they will be on the surface and you can syphon them out. Here's a video of Jurijs Jutjajevs working on a dry start where he uses them.
I’m glad that you mentioned this!! It was actually something that had crossed my mind after I saw one person accidentally end up with springtails in their dry start, and it makes total sense to me. I did see one person suggesting that a large population could potentially end up decaying in the tank but honestly they’re so small and lightweight it would probably be fine and easy to fix.

Thank you so much for mentioning this and including the video, I think this is the way I’ll have to go with it!

I'm curious about the shape of this tank. Do you fill it up all the way? or is the angled glass just for aesthetics?

Also, how did you anchor your spiderwood?

P.S. Your scape looks really nice and natural.
It is a really interesting shape! Yes it fills up all the way! It’s the Aqueon 8.8 shrimp tank but I won’t be using their filter. The opening at the top is maybe about 6” or so wide, since the diagonal cut is there on the front, so when you fill it, the slanted cut allows you to sort of see inside the tank at an above-angle as if you were wearing goggles looking down into water. It’s pretty interesting.

As for the spider wood, this piece stays sunken underwater without floating all on its own. Most of it is freely on top of the substrate but the back end portion is sort of dug in and the dragon stones lean on it.
 
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