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DRY START METHOD QUESTION - NEWBIE HERE!

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Hi Guys,

I just started my tank yesterday using the dry start method and i just have some few questions.

1. Is it okay if im using an airline tubing with an aerator to put air inside the tank?
2. Do i have to leave an opening in the lid?
3. Can i use dsm in sand substrate as well?
4. Is there a benefit if i use the water from other aquarium for misting?
5. Is my planting too excessive?
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Pictures attached below for your reference.

Hope you guys could help me. Thank you

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1) I have never done this, but I don't see how it could hurt.

2) Yes, you want there to be a bit of air circulation. If there is too much humidity, it might promote mold formation

3) I would imagine so, yes

4) It depends. You might have some nitrates/other nutrients in the other aquarium water, so that could help the plants along. Of course, you could also just directly mix up a dilute fertilization solution for spraying

5) No, I think the plant density is fine
 

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Hi Guys,

I just started my tank yesterday using the dry start method and i just have some few questions.

1. Is it okay if im using an airline tubing with an aerator to put air inside the tank?
2. Do i have to leave an opening in the lid?
3. Can i use dsm in sand substrate as well?
4. Is there a benefit if i use the water from other aquarium for misting?
5. Is my planting too excessive?
View attachment 1047491
View attachment 1047490
Pictures attached below for your reference.

Hope you guys could help me. Thank you
1) The key to success is controlling humidity. In a perfect world you want as close to 100% humidity as possible while still allowing for some air exchange. That's really hard to manage, so generally you keep it completely covered and only uncover it once to three times a day to mist.

2) you do not need to leave an opening.

3) you can definitely use inert substrate such as sand, BUT you absolutely must use fertilizer in your misting water then. Otherwise your plants do not have any nutrients to grow.

4) There is no real benefit to using old aquarium water and potentially some issues if you introduce something you don't want that's already in the old aquarium water (such as algae).

5) yes, it definitely is. The whole point of dry start method is to let plants grow quickly before flooding (such as when you are going low tech but still really want a carpet). In your case you have enough plants to cover the whole tank already, so I'm not sure what the dry start gets you other then potentially killing your plant mass if it dries out, or potentially killing your plant mass if adjusts to the emersed form but fails to readjust to the submersed form after the tank is flooded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1) The key to success is controlling humidity. In a perfect world you want as close to 100% humidity as possible while still allowing for some air exchange. That's really hard to manage, so generally you keep it completely covered and only uncover it once to three times a day to mist.

2) you do not need to leave an opening.

3) you can definitely use inert substrate such as sand, BUT you absolutely must use fertilizer in your misting water then. Otherwise your plants do not have any nutrients to grow.

4) There is no real benefit to using old aquarium water and potentially some issues if you introduce something you don't want that's already in the old aquarium water (such as algae).

5) yes, it definitely is. The whole point of dry start method is to let plants grow quickly before flooding (such as when you are going low tech but still really want a carpet). In your case you have enough plants to cover the whole tank already, so I'm not sure what the dry start gets you other then potentially killing your plant mass if it dries out, or potentially killing your plant mass if adjusts to the emersed form but fails to readjust to the submersed form after the tank is flooded.

Thank you guys for the inputs.

I will take note each of them. The reason why i used dsm is because my elevation is too high and im afraid that if i flood it, it will landslide.

It's my 5th day since the start of dsm. And i saw some wilted/dried parts of monte carlo, do i need to remove them or just leave them be?

Thank you so much again guys!
 

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Thank you guys for the inputs.

I will take note each of them. The reason why i used dsm is because my elevation is too high and im afraid that if i flood it, it will landslide.

It's my 5th day since the start of dsm. And i saw some wilted/dried parts of monte carlo, do i need to remove them or just leave them be?

Thank you so much again guys!
The more you touch it the more it will fall apart. I would leave it alone. Just keep the cover on and missed it regular. Don't put more air in other than when you remove the cover to mist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The more you touch it the more it will fall apart. I would leave it alone. Just keep the cover on and missed it regular. Don't put more air in other than when you remove the cover to mist.

Got it. Will just let it be. Another question, can i use rotala as well? im planning to put a rotala on the background and i already have them. Can i use dsm on them as well? Thanks
 

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Got it. Will just let it be. Another question, can i use rotala as well? im planning to put a rotala on the background and i already have them. Can i use dsm on them as well? Thanks
Yes you can, but stem plants are even more prone to drying out then lower lying plants in my experience so I would wait on it if possible.
 
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