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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys;

Considering purchasing dry fertilizer, considerably cheaper than liquid fertilizers sold here, the only place I can get KNO3 and the other fertilizers are from an Agriculture equipment store and they only sell them in 25 Kg bags. But when I went to check on the products and found an expiry date on the bags a duration of 6 years from packaging. With my current 2 tanks I'll run only 2Kg in the next 6 years.

John Dinh from Aquascapist website states that a fertilizer has no expiry date as long the fertilizer is properly sealed. Is this true?

I can't real trust a salesmen on a product expiring after 6 years.
 

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I'm not aware of an expiration date for them. I would just ask several online retailers about smaller quantities. I know aquariumfertilizer.com says they will ship "internationally". However I would check your local laws since you would be the one picking it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Customs are terrible here they easily lose packages here and if I use aramex to ship it to my country and pass it through customs it would cost more than the 25kg fert here.
 

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I can't see KNO3 going bad. If not kept airtight it would absorb moisture from the air otherwise I see nothing that would cause it to expire. The other nutrients that have chelates would degrade over time though. Why not package it up and sell it to others around you that may need it. You can't be the only one.
 

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As mentioned, KNO3 is slightly hygroscopic, so it is best kept in a dry, dark area.

Other than that, there is no harm in storing it (and other macronutrients) for long periods of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As mentioned, KNO3 is slightly hygroscopic, so it is best kept in a dry, dark area.

Other than that, there is no harm in storing it (and other macronutrients) for long periods of time.
I found a 1Kg pottasium sulfate sold at the store in a clear bag. I think the bag was sealed by the store.

The strange thing that I didn't know is that 0-0-50 is another way to say potassium sulfate, this is according to sales clerk, is that correct?
 

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The three numbers only represent percentages of macro nutrients NPK.
(N)itrogen - (P)hosphourus - (K) potassium

It doesn't explain which chemical is used to supply the nutrient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The three numbers only represent percentages of macro nutrients NPK.
(N)itrogen - (P)hosphourus - (K) potassium

It doesn't explain which chemical is used to supply the nutrient.

yeah I knew that part, but its commonly known by the analysis 0-0-50 as urea 46-0-0. Which is a basic fertilizers. That is my understanding anyway
 

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The strange thing that I didn't know is that 0-0-50 is another way to say potassium sulfate, this is according to sales clerk, is that correct?
Yes, 0-0-50 is usually potassium sulfate.

However, as mentioned, strictly speaking, it does not have to be since the numbers only indicate the NPK ratio.
 
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