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Dropsy can be cured if spotted early and treatment begun quickly. I'd always try to give my pets a fighting chance and try to treat it, see if your fish still has the will to fight and live... But that's simply my opinion, ultimately it's up to you to judge if its too far gone and cruel to let it die slowly or if you think it could make it with your help (treatment).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thats why I posted, I too always try to fix what can be fixed
but thats why I posted saying its 5 yrs old, I was told he is in his last days as most bettas dont last longer than 4-5 yrs? and I was thinking maybe this is just his time then, ive had him for 5 years and never seen his scales so feathered out, and he wont eat anything. its been two days since hes been able to eat. hes tried to bite at some food a few times but either cant get a hold of it and gives up or he just looks at it and continues sleeping

gave him an epsom salt bath last night and he seemed to like it, I just dont want to freak him out by grabbing him over and over to give him multiple baths per day like some ppl suggest
 

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Unforunately I do not own betta(s) and can't verify life span (i'm sure other users here can *poke at Art by Stef*) to offer help with that. Though with the multiple baths, it can be made less stressful. 1: Keep lights off over both main and hospital/bath tank, keep it as dark as reasonably possible if still normal 'day time' for the tank turn lights back on maybe 30 mins after betta the fish is put back in.. if there are no plant it doesn't hurt to keep lights off longer though. 2: Use a cup to transfer the betta not a net, so it stays in water. Gasping for air in a net would be like someone taking you (with the flu) and trying to drown you for a minute.. no fun. Also keep temp and pH same between tanks reduces stress.
 

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Average lifespan for a domestic splendens is 2-5 years based on genetics, water condition, feeding, so on, so forth.

Dropsy in a betta, once obvious, is generally fatal, and quickly. You can attempt to treat, but if it hasn't killed the fish within 4-5 days, it's possible that you're not looking at classic dropsy.

Agreed, keep the lights low or off, and never use a net for a betta - always use a small cup or drinking glass, or, if it's a pet store fish, keep the little plastic cup they come in.
 

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I agree with above.
Unfortunately, I have never had a betta make it over 5 years old.
It was a veil tail in the 80s, and just found it belly up one day.
I just started breeding bettas last year, but those I got in the past as pets usually make it to 2-2 1/2 years, so might get my advice from you, Ras :)

I do know dropsy is a symptom, not a disease, and I never had any young fish of any type get it. Only once had an older female swordtail with it, treated her Maracyn 1 and 2, and epsom salt, and she made a complete turn around, and she lasted another year.

Never had a betta do a turn around after the "pine cone" symptoms are apparent, even using kanamycin. Just seemed to stretch the agony for a week. I just try to keep them comfortable, add IAL or dried banana leaf because it is suppose to have soothing properties and gives them something to rest on. When they refuse food or show obvious distress/pain/difficulty remaining upright is when I euthanize.

With all the controversy with method, I place the fish in a cup of it's water, and put in the freezer. It's the most humane to me. I have yet to remove a fish from the freezer and see the "gaspy death mask" or signs of stress. Appear to just go to sleep, and look peaceful. Then they get buried in the garden to start the cycle of life again.

If nature took it's course in the wild, it would of been something's dinner long ago-only the strong survive.

But, with a pet, that is a judgement call only the owner can make, and either route you go is the right decision.

-Stef*
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
rip mermaid the manfish.
stef- p much all the bad signs you listed, not being able to eat, pinecone body and he couldnt keep upright unless a leaf was helping him stay up, otherwise he'd lay on his side

couldnt watch it anymore. and I saw some article saying that it wasnt certain if the fish goes unconscious before ice crystals start forming in its muscle tissue , and if it is awake for that then It would be extremely painful so I didnt take the chance, put my hand in the tank and he let me gently lift him out. I took the gruesome route.. was alot harder on me but I'm 100% sure it was easier for him. quick and with no pain ]

anyways, thanks for the help guys. rip

oh and as for why he lasted 5 yrs, I have no idea. he was in an unplanted bowl with 0 waterchanges for half his life before I rescued him
didnt expect him to even survive the transition to a real tank but he did
fed him mix of 3 things, black worms omega one tetra food and betta pelets (not the best diet I know)
I think it was just his genes, and thats what I told the past owner as to "if an unplanted bowl isn't healthy why isn't he dead?"
he was a survivor

alright eulogy over, lol
 

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Sorry to hear he passed, but it's a normal part of our passion and this hobby - I'll admit, a fish like a betta, that possesses a lot of personality, makes it more difficult.

I've got an 11 year old pink convict and trust me, that one is going to hurt when it's his time.

My current betta has balance issues and is a serious fin biter. He spends a lot of time on the floor of the tank, propped against something. He can't float at will, but is energetic, eats well and is active when people are around. It's not his time yet, but I do always keep a wary eye on him.
 
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