The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't used a quarantine tank but plan to set up one using a cheap 10 gallon tank.

So, I've been reading about quarantine tanks on the Internet and one thing really bugs me.

Most people seem to use a minimal setup for a quarantine tank (bare bottom, fake plants, sponge filter, etc.). Doesn't that kind of environment stress fish more? Let's say you have a sick fish and move him to a quarantine tank. I guess that moving the poor fish to a small tank with an artificial environment would make him sick even more. What are your thoughts?
 

·
Fresh Fish Freak
Joined
·
24,403 Posts
It's a judgment call, and a case of weighing the benefits against the possible risks.

In the case of a sick fish, moving the fish is usually stressful- but the risks are usually outweighed by reducing the risk of the fish being picked on by the other healthy fish in the tank (which is often the case) as well as the risk of contagion to the rest of the tank.

In the case of acclimating new fish, it's easier to control a "bare bones" environment, especially if it turns out you need to medicate the fish for anything they may have brought in.

I'll use disposable live plant clippings if I have spares lying around. Plastic plants are easier to sterilize afterwards, though, and I'm not at all sure that most fish can tell the difference anyways- it's the ability to hide that they really care about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
I personally dont use a quarantine tank either. I've had new fish that brought in ich to my tank, tried curing before (whole tank), but no result (years ago). Now, If I do get any new fish, 1st thing I do raise the temperature, and use dip method 40-50 mins. and as ways, keep my water squeaky clean. havent had any problem, w/ my old ones. Just some of the bad batch didn't make it.

when you try to capture a sick fish from a planted 55 gallon tank, poor think looses half it's life just trying to scape from your net. I let it be, till I see it won't make it, then reach in there w/ a net, and put in a small floating breeder box, and wish for the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
I haven't used a quarantine tank but plan to set up one using a cheap 10 gallon tank.

So, I've been reading about quarantine tanks on the Internet and one thing really bugs me.

Most people seem to use a minimal setup for a quarantine tank (bare bottom, fake plants, sponge filter, etc.). Doesn't that kind of environment stress fish more? Let's say you have a sick fish and move him to a quarantine tank. I guess that moving the poor fish to a small tank with an artificial environment would make him sick even more. What are your thoughts?
It isn't about the new fish, it's about the other ones you have that can get sick from the new ones. Extra heat and the option of salt are really good cures for whatever ailments they may have. Wouldn't do either to my big tank. Some of the treatments can kill scaleless's, snails, plants and stain the tank. The fish probably came from a bare tank to boot. It isn't like you're really changing anything for them except giving them a chance to survive in their own little sanctuary. Also, fish aren't smart.
 

·
I ♥ BBA!
Joined
·
12,768 Posts
I have found using a piece or two of pvc piping weighted down in a quarantine tank does wonders for reducing stress. It gives the fish a place to hide, is easy to keep clean and is cheap. Also, lowering the light or no light for the first day helps as well in the transfer.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
I keep a 20g running at my office for new fish. They end up staying in that tank for a couple months before I take them home. It's taken months to get the display tank stocked and I'm not willing to put those fish at risk.

SteveU
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
There´s nothing written about how to set up your quarantine tank. Mine is a 15 gallon bow front with a HOB filter, it has gravel and right now is housing the few plants I could save from the 100 gal tank crash last week.

Keeping it bare bones makes it easier for medicating, but you could keep it with gravel and plants that would resist medications. Of course having a fully planted tank would make it very difficult to monitor the fishes´ health if they hide, but a few plants and substrate shouldn´t hurt at all.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top