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The picture look good. I personally have not tried to separate the crypts unless it had runners or was super established/mature. I personally would wait until you get a young runner then cut and replant it. With dwarf lilies, I just let them sit on top of the substrate until the roots shoot out and make their way into the substrate. After a couple of weeks if you don't see any growth flip it over; there is also a small chance you got a bad bulb if you don't see anything after 3-4 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The picture look good. I personally have not tried to separate the crypts unless it had runners or was super established/mature. I personally would wait until you get a young runner then cut and replant it. With dwarf lilies, I just let them sit on top of the substrate until the roots shoot out and make their way into the substrate. After a couple of weeks if you don't see any growth flip it over; there is also a small chance you got a bad bulb if you don't see anything after 3-4 weeks.
Thanks. I'll keep an eye on things. My experience has been that crypts are slow to get going, but once they do they can really take off. I've never had a bulb plant before, so this is a new thing.

You planted them well, but you could separate a lot of plants off of those rhizome clumps and end up with a lot more individual plants if you wanted.
Thanks; is it necessary to do this, or just an option?

For the crypt parva you can spread it much more out
It grows very slowly as well just an fyi

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Thanks; I don't mind a slow grower.
 

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Crowded plants compete with each other for nutrients. As long as you provide enough nutrients and light this isn't an issue. If you separate the plants, you encourage each plant to grow faster in response. Trimming away older leaves and crowded plants is also beneficial to the plant's health because it helps the plant to prioritize its energy usage.

Personally I think it looks weird when you have them in the perfect circle that they grow in the pots. That's "overcrowded and unnatural" in my book. But it's just my opinion on aesthetics so feel free to ignore me.

Anyway plants don't have emotions so being crowded or being forced to spread faster are entirely up to you. Your plants look great either way!
 

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When i planted my Tiger Lotus which I think is the same as the Lily you have, I planted it on it's side as both roots and stems come from the same point on the bulb.

Otherwise, all else looks good and as these other's said, it's preference as far as spitting them or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Crowded plants compete with each other for nutrients. As long as you provide enough nutrients and light this isn't an issue. If you separate the plants, you encourage each plant to grow faster in response. Trimming away older leaves and crowded plants is also beneficial to the plant's health because it helps the plant to prioritize its energy usage.

Personally I think it looks weird when you have them in the perfect circle that they grow in the pots. That's "overcrowded and unnatural" in my book. But it's just my opinion on aesthetics so feel free to ignore me.

Anyway plants don't have emotions so being crowded or being forced to spread faster are entirely up to you. Your plants look great either way!
Thanks––so, for the wendtii, for example, I could pull it up and break off the little pieces and replant without harming it?

Crowded plants compete with each other for nutrients. As long as you provide enough nutrients and light this isn't an issue. If you separate the plants, you encourage each plant to grow faster in response. Trimming away older leaves and crowded plants is also beneficial to the plant's health because it helps the plant to prioritize its energy usage.

Personally I think it looks weird when you have them in the perfect circle that they grow in the pots. That's "overcrowded and unnatural" in my book. But it's just my opinion on aesthetics so feel free to ignore me.

Anyway plants don't have emotions so being crowded or being forced to spread faster are entirely up to you. Your plants look great either way!
One further question: If I were to split up the crypt plants, would I need a knife to do so, or could I pull them apart by hand? I saw that some people split the crypt parva as well and then plant the individual pieces an inch or two away from each other––does that sound right?
 

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You could use a sterilized knife to split rhizomes, or you could gently wiggle them until the plants split. All you have to do is separate plants from the clump without harming the root system enough to cause it to melt. I usually just gently wiggle until some come loose, then replant nearby. You can usually turn one of those small pots into a dozen or so plants
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You could use a sterilized knife to split rhizomes, or you could gently wiggle them until the plants split. All you have to do is separate plants from the clump without harming the root system enough to cause it to melt. I usually just gently wiggle until some come loose, then replant nearby. You can usually turn one of those small pots into a dozen or so plants
Thanks. I might start with one plant to see how it works out and then try the others. On the wendtii I'm already seeing new roots shoot out, so I suppose that's a good sign.

When i planted my Tiger Lotus which I think is the same as the Lily you have, I planted it on it's side as both roots and stems come from the same point on the bulb.

Otherwise, all else looks good and as these other's said, it's preference as far as spitting them or not.
Thanks. I'm already seeing new growth from the bulb, so I think it will be best to leave it where it is.
 

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Yeah, they're acclimating and attaching their anchoring roots. They'll try to grow baby plants and spread outwards after, which is when they will want an inch or so from each other to grow into mother plants. But in nature they actually grow in bunches where baby plants split off and drift so it's not necessary to separate the clumps unless you want faster growth/more plants!

More plants are always nice. You can trade them on the forums for even more plants.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, they're acclimating and attaching their anchoring roots. They'll try to grow baby plants and spread outwards after, which is when they will want an inch or so from each other to grow into mother plants. But in nature they actually grow in bunches where baby plants split off and drift so it's not necessary to separate the clumps unless you want faster growth/more plants!

More plants are always nice. You can trade them on the forums for even more plants.
I did end up separating the crypts while I was doing maintenance today, and I was amazed at how much coverage I got! Hopefully they'll do OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Glad it went well! I may be needing to follow suit buy summer

My wendtii have been growing much faster now that I've put Tropica capsules by them instead of Flourish tabs. Parva mini is looking like they are responding too.
Great! I have not grown parva or wendtii before, but I have grown lutea and found that after a while it really took off (practically taking over my old 10-gallon)! The lutea at the right side of my 20 is still adjusting so it doesn't look great right now, but hopefully it will pick up soon.
 
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