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Does De*Nitrate work with filters which have a flow rate above 50 GPH. I have a Aqueon Underwater Power Filter for a 10 gallon and it has a GPH of 60 gallons.
Bottled bacteria has varying levels of success, probably directly related to how long the darn bottle has been sitting on a shelf. Sometimes they work great, other times not so much. I haven't noticed anything particular about seachem's product vs everyone elses.
 

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Before accepting the "Aquarium Science" article at face value, read through this thread: Best bio media.

Many members have had good detrifying success with the likes of lava rock and other deep-pore media, but it does take many months to develop the anaerobic bacteria.

Also, Brightwell has recently introduced a product called "NitratR", which, they claim, adsorbs nitrate quickly. I haven't tried it, but it would be interesting to know if anyone has.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Before accepting the "Aquarium Science" article at face value, read through this thread: Best bio media.

Many members have had good detrifying success with the likes of lava rock and other deep-pore media, but it does take many months to develop the anaerobic bacteria.

Also, Brightwell has recently introduced a product called "NitratR", which, they claim, adsorbs nitrate quickly. I haven't tried it, but it would be interesting to know if anyone has.

Theretically, would De*Nitrate work with a flow of 60 GPH when it recommends 50 or lower?
 

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Theretically, would De*Nitrate work with a flow of 60 GPH when it recommends 50 or lower?
My belief is that the De-nitrate product is not the best option. Lava rock has been mentioned, by many, as consistently good. Another member, @Edward, suggested a new product: "CerMedia", which I have been testing for about 3 months now. It has unusually deep pores. My nitrates, over the last month, have been running about 5-10ppm lower than they had been. However, I cannot say that it is due to the CerMedia, as yet. I have more testing to do.

Concerning your flow question: anaerobic bacteria, as the name may imply, do not like oxygen. Dentrifying designs that seem to be used successfully, mainly in saltwater tanks, use very low flow - just enough to keep nutrients (carbon) moving through it. Very deep and small pores accomplish a similar restriction of flow, allowing the bacteria to avoid O2. There are several design ideas, here on TPT, for adding a small canister within a canister, where denitrifying media is isolated so that very low flow moves through this mini-canister, while the main flow bypasses it. Again, just placing lava rock or, maybe, CerMedia in the filter will allow development of anaerobic bacteria deep within the pores.
 

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If you have any plants and you do any water changes in your tank, that is what is reducing your nitrates, not the media. The link mentioned above, everyone has a planted tank, except me. I inadvertently did a 1 year test of 7 liters of Matrix in my unplanted tank and nitrates never went below 40-80 ppm (same color on the API test). Threw all the matrix out. Like most professional fish keepers and phD' chemists say for media, if you hold up your media to your mouth and can't breathe through it, water will never flow through it either as water takes the path of least resistance. How true.
 

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If you have any plants and you do any water changes in your tank, that is what is reducing your nitrates, not the media.
Not entirely correct. If nitrate levels are consistently at a stable level and the plant load and the plant growth is consistent year in and year out, and water changes are performed at the same level and frequency, then a significant reduction in nitrates to a new stable level is likely due to something else. However, I am not willing to say, yet, that it is due to this new media.
 
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If you have any plants and you do any water changes in your tank, that is what is reducing your nitrates, not the media. The link mentioned above, everyone has a planted tank, except me. I inadvertently did a 1 year test of 7 liters of Matrix in my unplanted tank and nitrates never went below 40-80 ppm (same color on the API test). Threw all the matrix out. Like most professional fish keepers and phD' chemists say for media, if you hold up your media to your mouth and can't breathe through it, water will never flow through it either as water takes the path of least resistance. How true.
Water doesn't need to flow through the media, it needs to flow over the media. The idea is surface area. A piece of lava rock has more surface area than a piece of granite, so it's going to make for better media.

Filter Media Comparison - microscopic images Green Aqua

In regards to your Matrix comment, microscopic analysis shows Matrix has a higher surface area to volume ratio than almost any other media. However, there is almost no evidence of any filter media reducing nitrate, and I don't believe Seachem makes that claim about Matrix. You had it right in your first sentence, plants and water changes reduce nitrates, not filter media. (There is an argument for a denitrifying deep sand bed, but that it primarily only seen if reef tanks)

Just as a thought, what media did you decide to switch to after leaving Matrix?
 

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Water doesn't need to flow through the media, it needs to flow over the media. The idea is surface area. A piece of lava rock has more surface area than a piece of granite, so it's going to make for better media.

Filter Media Comparison - microscopic images Green Aqua

In regards to your Matrix comment, microscopic analysis shows Matrix has a higher surface area to volume ratio than almost any other media. However, there is almost no evidence of any filter media reducing nitrate, and I don't believe Seachem makes that claim about Matrix. You had it right in your first sentence, plants and water changes reduce nitrates, not filter media. (There is an argument for a denitrifying deep sand bed, but that it primarily only seen if reef tanks)

Just as a thought, what media did you decide to switch to after leaving Matrix?
The above site is a for profit site so that can be thrown out. Also, all those pictures, the pores are too small and clog in weeks so no bacteria will survive, simple physics now. Very simple... show me ANY scientific paper from any government, university or the manufactures site themselves that show Matrix (or Biohome) reduces nitrates. Seachem and Biohome have nothing to prove it works (proved with response from their own emails). If they did it would be plastered all over their web site, and there is nothing. Go ahead and email them like hundreds of others have, then return nothing. If they did have any scientific proof they would publish it. But then when they are proved wrong, they would eat crow and be sued.

Here is your so called Matrix that proves it does nothing to reduce nitrates. Again, here is proof it does not work. Post here any scientific article that will disprove these findings. Just to let you know... Seachem has absolutely NO scientific proof or test that any of their products do what they say, again go ahead and email them and ask. Some of the medications do work however, and yes Prime does reduce chlorine...

Since nitrates in all county water systems is the biggest problem they have to deal with, you would think that they would incorporate anything like this media to reduce and remove nitrates. They don't because it does not work.

Oh, I switched to 10 and 20 ppi Poret foam and simple Pot Scrubbies.

Not entirely correct. If nitrate levels are consistently at a stable level and the plant load and the plant growth is consistent year in and year out, and water changes are performed at the same level and frequency, then a significant reduction in nitrates to a new stable level is likely due to something else. However, I am not willing to say, yet, that it is due to this new media.
Yes, growing plants and changes in bioload.
 

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Very simple... show me ANY scientific paper from any government, university or the manufactures site themselves that show Matrix (or Biohome) reduces nitrates. Seachem and Biohome have nothing to prove it works (proved with response from their own emails). If they did it would be plastered all over their web site, and there is nothing. Go ahead and email them like hundreds of others have, then return nothing. If they did have any scientific proof they would publish it. But then when they are proved wrong, they would eat crow and be sued.

Here is your so called Matrix that proves it does nothing to reduce nitrates. Again, here is proof it does not work. Post here any scientific article that will disprove these findings. Just to let you know... Seachem has absolutely NO scientific proof or test that any of their products do what they say, again go ahead and email them and ask. Some of the medications do work however, and yes Prime does reduce chlorine...

Since nitrates in all county water systems is the biggest problem they have to deal with, you would think that they would incorporate anything like this media to reduce and remove nitrates. They don't because it does not work.

Oh, I switched to 10 and 20 ppi Poret foam and simple Pot Scrubbies.
I don't think you read my whole post. I don't think any filtration media reduces nitrates, and I don't think any of them claim that they do. I'm agreeing with you that none of these magic bullets reduce nitrates.
 

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I don't think you read my whole post. I don't think any filtration media reduces nitrates, and I don't think any of them claim that they do. I'm agreeing with you that none of these magic bullets reduce nitrates.
Great. Just wanted you to see that the surface area of Matrix claims is the nitrogen molecule which is billions of times smaller than one bacterium cell. That is what Seachem sells, which means nothing in an aquarium.
 

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Something occurred to me that made me realize that my comments may be somewhat misleading. My testing of the media is in my QT. I maintain pH in the 7.5 area in that. I could not use denitrifying media in my main tank because the pH is so low. Anaerobic bacteria will not thrive, if they even survive, in acidic conditions. This may be why others in this post have not had success in doing it.
 

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I think there’s an easy experiment that can be run to prove de-nitrifying filter media once and for all. I have no interest in running it myself (I genuinely don’t care, I’m adding nitrates for my plants), but for those of you who really do care about the efficacy of this stuff, you can test it yourself.



  • Set up a new, virgin tank. Fill with remineralized RO water, to whatever Gh you want to test.
  • Dose the tank to 40ppm nitrate with a known fertilizer
  • Set up a new filter of your choosing, and only add the de-nitrifying media
  • Black the tank out completely, to prevent the growth of any algae
  • Run the tank for however long it takes to confirm or debunk your hypothesis. Do zero water changes, and top off the tank with RO water only.
  • If you measure anything lower than 40ppm nitrates, you can confirm the media works. If a year goes by with no drop in nitrates, then the media doesn’t work.
 

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I think there’s an easy experiment that can be run to prove de-nitrifying filter media once and for all. I have no interest in running it myself (I genuinely don’t care, I’m adding nitrates for my plants), but for those of you who really do care about the efficacy of this stuff, you can test it yourself.



  • Set up a new, virgin tank. Fill with remineralized RO water, to whatever Gh you want to test.
  • Dose the tank to 40ppm nitrate with a known fertilizer
  • Set up a new filter of your choosing, and only add the de-nitrifying media
  • Black the tank out completely, to prevent the growth of any algae
  • Run the tank for however long it takes to confirm or debunk your hypothesis. Do zero water changes, and top off the tank with RO water only.
  • If you measure anything lower than 40ppm nitrates, you can confirm the media works. If a year goes by with no drop in nitrates, then the media doesn’t work.
That' what the author has already done, multiple times. Did you read his test procedures? Just use those to duplicate, but as you said, nobody will do it themselves because they won't take the time. One tank is not any type of controlled experiment.
 

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That author never took pH into account and the NO3 levels, at which the study was performed, would create acidic conditions unless buffered and monitored.
 
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