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Collectoritis Patient
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 24 volt Burkert 6011 solenoid and had a 12 volt power supply laying around so that's what I used to power it. I'm getting some CO2 still leaking through when the valve is closed. Do I need the 24 volt supply to get more force on the spring that closes the valve? I'm only running 15 psi.
 

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Algae Grower
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6,444 Posts
Does it say 24V 60HZ or 24V DC? If it's the first one, you need a 24V AC adapter. If it's the second one, you need a 24V DC adapter. A 12V DC adapter will burn up the coil.

If you have a leaky solenoid, you've probably got some debris on the orifice causing the leak.
 

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Collectoritis Patient
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2,322 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
It says 24 volt 60 hz.

So you think I may have overheated it? It's been running for a little over a week now with the other adapter.

Seems I may end up spending the money I "saved" on an expensive AC adapter. :(
 

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Super Moderator
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What is the current that the power supply can provide?

There are several possibilities:

With a lower rated voltage power supply, the solenoid will not function, or function erratically.

If the current that the power supply can provide is less, then it will burn out as well.

In addition to all this, you were supplying DC voltage to something that requires AC voltage; for some devices it might be OK, while for others it would not (depends on the electronics that are inside the solenoid).

In any case, it would be best not to supply DC to something that requires AC. It is definitely a bad idea to supply AC to something that requires DC.
 

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Pixel Prestidigitator
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4,343 Posts
The coil pulls the solenoid open not closed in most circumstances. The valve closes under spring pressure. Doubt the leaking has anything to do with the electrical end of things.

For a 24v power supply look to air conditioning. The transformers for most units are 110v input with 24v out. Not very expensive at all. Just mount it in a box with a strain relief grommet for the wiring.

Relays/solenoids can be run on ac or dc. It's basically a coil of wire to form an electromagnet. What changes is the voltage requirement. DC requires less. Generally 40-50% of AC
 

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The coil pulls the solenoid open not closed in most circumstances. The valve closes under spring pressure. Doubt the leaking has anything to do with the electrical end of things.

For a 24v power supply look to air conditioning. The transformers for most units are 110v input with 24v out. Not very expensive at all. Just mount it in a box with a strain relief grommet for the wiring.

Relays/solenoids can be run on ac or dc. It's basically a coil of wire to form an electromagnet. What changes is the voltage requirement. DC requires less. Generally 40-50% of AC
depends if this is normally open or normally closed solenoid valve.
normally open is open with no power supplied to it ,takes power to close it;
normally closed is closed with no power supplied to it ,takes power to open it.
 

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Pixel Prestidigitator
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4,343 Posts
depends if this is normally open or normally closed solenoid valve.
normally open is open with no power supplied to it ,takes power to close it;
normally closed is closed with no power supplied to it ,takes power to open it.
True but in this type application the more common way would be normally closed.
And I did allude to that in the post
The coil pulls the solenoid open not closed in most circumstances. The valve closes under spring pressure. Doubt the leaking has anything to do with the electrical end of things.
Think about it. If you lose power your dosing with a normally open controller.

Looking at the spec sheet I can't tell if it's NO or NC. The EU version is NC. But it does say preferred mounting is with actuator upright. Do you have it that way?
 
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