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Answer is no.

I don't know much about lighting, but the lamp you showed won't even do. I've seen that at a LFS and it didn't look like it was able to grow anything. So many different type of LEDs. The type of LED that I've seen, which has been used successfully in an aquarium to grow plants are mostly these kinds:





I'd go with CF option 1 or 2 depending on the price of replacement bulbs you are able to find in your area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I dont' see any specs but I don't see any specs that says they're 24x 1W?

They don't look like high powered LEDs.
The manual lists the model as Tetra LED24-W but doesn't specifically state they're 1w each.

I would calculate a lumens per watt and then consider if there's a metal, polished, or painted parabolic fixture of some sort.
Lumens/watt would be bulb-dependent, wouldn't it?

The Finnex seems to have a metal reflector; the JBJ may be painted - I can't be sure.

I'm leaning toward the Finnex but I still have to research the bulbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Answer is no.

I don't know much about lighting, but the lamp you showed won't even do. I've seen that at a LFS and it didn't look like it was able to grow anything.
It's done well enough with mosses and java fern and okay with m.mattogrossense and lysimachia if the stems are 5" or more to start with. Two fast-growing species of hygro won't do well in that tank and I think I've ruled out deficiencies other than light.

I'm hoping to get enough light to support cyperus helferi and lobelia cardinalis (small form) as well as a few RRF. The current fixture isn't enough to keep salvinia healthy.

Thanks for the suggestions.
 

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No way is that a 24w LED fixture. If it was, you'd have so much friggin light you'd be knee deep in algae.

It seems as though they can be bought for about 25-30 bucks. If that is the case, I wouldn't expect them to be any more than 10 watts total. Probably less. Information on them is very lacking.
 

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LED efficiency varies WILDLY right now.

So you can't compare watts to watts. You have to (in our neck of the woods) compare EFFICIENCY TO EFFICIENCY (all caps for emphasis...not shouting :D)

Good LEDs can hit 120-160 lumens/watt. CFL's usually hover around 50-70. What's even worse for the CFL is that they throw their inefficient light all over the freaking place. LEDs shoot that light at a 120 degree angle downward, by design. MUCH less light spill, and sometimes you need no reflector/optic at all.

But they all vary. Some trashy LEDs (the ones that have dozens and dozens of tiny emitters, but uses like 5-10 watts) are so weak that they aren't nearly as useful as a single 10-watt LED like a Cree XML.



Right now, as the technology sits---- you should be looking for units that use true 1-watt LEDs or higher. (count the LEDs, then look at the wattage, and that should give you the answer). But the BEST ones are in the 3-8 watt range (per LED).
 

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Trying to determine if moving from a 24x1w light to a 25/26w refugium fixture would be worthwhile. Gaseous CO2 isn't an option, so I'm hoping for medium light suitable with Excel. 16" from light to substrate.

Specifics here
No.



There are couple things I am not sure, the Tetra site said it's 24LEDs but did not say how many watts each. If they are 1W like you said, the small fixture will be hot without a fan. So is it hot? If not really, then they are unlikely to be 1W


The fixture in your link does not look like they have lens. I am much more familiar with LED running 60 degree lens. In reefing, the 1W of LED with 60 degree can roughly equate to 3W+ CF and 2.5W T5 with reflector. Of course, brands do matter, both LED and PCs/T5s. When I come across another LED fixture without lens, I will note the PAR. You are welcome to PM me once a while. Note also, one thing, even though when the par is same for a CFL and vs a reef type LED, the reef type LED generally is much better for corals and possibly plants due to the fact that LED is more efficient in the blue range. CF contains green in their spectral mix and green is also registered in PAR meter while we said green is not useful to neither corals nor plants.

Here is the PAR of a 15x1W LED with 60 degree lens, you can compare it with other CF chart
[/url] Flickr 上 WingoAgencyPAR38 15x1W WingoLED DayLight 6,700K PAR DATA[/IMG]
 
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