The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

Thinking of starting a small 2.6 gallon scape and just making it a red cherry shrimp tank. Is it still necessary to cycle the tank if I plan on only starting with 20ish shrimp? Usually I would assume so, but their bio waste should be so low and I will have a strong pearlweed carpet and Java moss to soak up most nitrogen...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,165 Posts
Yes, you absolutely need to cycle a shrimp tank. Ideally for longer than you would a tank with no shrimp.

But before that, you need to read everything you can here in the shrimp section. Make sure you understand their care, water requirements per species, all that goes along with keeping them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,699 Posts
If it's your first shrimp tank, a minimum 10 gallon tank is recommended. If no room, then a 5, but nothing smaller.

Be sure you know what parameters the shrimp do well in, including GH and KH. RO water or distilled and minerals is preferred over tap, since tap can vary so much from one place to the next.


Many people who keep shrimp are starting to do fish-less cycles. That is, using ammonia to cycle a tank. This is usually Ace Hardware Ammonia or Dr Timm's Ammonium. VERY little is actually required to cycle a tank. Other types of ammonia are likely to be harmful to tanks due to surfactants. (makes the ammonia sudsy)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Bigger is obviously better with all aquatic species, but I think you would be fine with 20 cherries in a 2.6—HOWEVER I would only start with 5 or 6.

I have kept several successful 3-5 gal planted shrimp colonies this way: start a new tank with bio material and 20% water from a previous tank, add 80% new water treated with any generic "makes tapwater safe for fish" product, then let the plants grow more algae & cycle the water for a few weeks. Next test the water and add 5-6 adult shrimp. If the shrimp are thriving a week later, you are good to go and can either buy more or just let them breed. I wouldn't start with 20, as they will quickly become overcrowded. Start with 5-10 and then let them breed to 20-30.

I like this above method of cycling a shrimp tank better than using more water treatments—there is less room for error, and there will be algae buildup already when you first introduce shrimp, so you won't have to worry about overfeeding problems effecting the water quality in such a small tank.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,165 Posts
The reason experienced shrimpkeepers like me "cycle" new shrimp tanks: buildup of Aufwuchs and all the little goodies that help shrimp thrive. The normal process for fishless cycling works well. But I generally run the initial process out to about 3 months just to make sure a tank is a sublime habitat.

Using old tank water does nothing. It'd be better to kickstart the cycle process with used filter media. That will speed things up with an initial dose of bacteria to populate a new tank.

But having shrimp IN the tank before it's cycled and established when it's that small and you're a beginner? No way. They're especially sensitive to ammonia and nitrite, so it's a bad idea. Wait til the tank is ready for them.

Nothing good happens fast in a shrimp tank. Especially a small one.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top