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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I feel like I am pumping a ton of CO2 into my tank, yet the indicator fluid stays blue. I have a sump filter, so im sure I am loosing some through surface transfer. I have it injected into the sump pump & it travels through about 10 feet of 1" tubing to the tank. You can see it is still blue, & the amount of bubbles from my filter outlet.
1031007
1031006
 

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75g, 33L, 2g and play tanks
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they do work. there is definitely a degree of accuracy that they lack. But they do work.

also, they don't work right away. You will not be able to sit there for 20 minutes and dial in your co2 with them. You will want to make small adjustments, probably once a day until you find your desired levels.

Testing by using pH levels is easier. You'll want the co2 to kick on early, by an hour or so. Then when the lights kick on you want there to be about a 1.0 pH drop? I don't know why I can't remember if it's a drop or increase right now. But 1.0 pH change is what you're looking for. So you'll need to test the water a few hours after the co2 is off and dissipated or used to get a good test of the base pH of your water.

I know there are much more in-depth threads about this on this site, I suggest looking at a couple of those.



Just looking at your photos we couldn't even begin to guess if that's too much co2, it does look like a fair amount but you don't tell us the tank size or anything else really.


PS. for plants, you want lighting right first and other parameters, co2 should be the last thing you dial in in my opinion. then you can starting play with the other ferts and things you are adding again after the co2 is in play. But without ferts and proper lighting the co2 will likely just cause algae growth.

also, look into a reactor for your setup. it will reduce or eliminate the bubbles.
 

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Drop checkers do work, but consider them a ball park estimate. They are not a very precise way to dial in CO2. Keep in mind, it is a lagging indicator and is telling you what was going on in your tank several hours ago.

The picture of the drop checker is not very good as it looks like the liquid is more clear than anything. What fluids are you using in it?

The best method is using a calibrated pH probe to measure the pH drop from a fully degassed sample. Whether you want to go the trouble depends much on your goals. In a high light planted tank full of stems, getting CO2 right is the first thing you want to do. It will make every other thing easier.

And if you really want help, post more details about the tank. Saying you are dumping tons of CO2 into the tank does not really mean anything. Most underestimate how much CO2 flow is needed for an optimal pH drop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought the glass thingy & fluid from Amazon. That is the fluid I am using. It has been in the tank for 3 days with CO2 injected at the same rate (only in the day time).

The tank is 90 gallons with 2 Fluval 3.0 Plant 48" fixtures over it. & with Sump filter system.

I have 8 angelfish, around 5 neons, 5 chery barbs, 3 bristle nose plecos, 3 cory cats, & about 5 small platys..

Bubble counter: 20210629_131454.mp4
 

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I bought the glass thingy & fluid from Amazon. That is the fluid I am using. It has been in the tank for 3 days with CO2 injected at the same rate (only in the day time).

The tank is 90 gallons with 2 Fluval 3.0 Plant 48" fixtures over it. & with Sump filter system.

I have 8 angelfish, around 5 neons, 5 chery barbs, 3 bristle nose plecos, 3 cory cats, & about 5 small platys..

Bubble counter: 20210629_131454.mp4
With a 90 gallon tank the CO2 is a constant stream. Too many bubbles to count. Hard to say by looking at your video, but could easily need to be turned up higher. Try turning it up but pay attention to the livestock. If they start heading toward the surface then the rate is too high.

Keep in mind the drop checker is two to three hours behind what is actually happening in the tank.

A better method is using the pH drop method. This involves getting a reading of a completely degassed water sample then injecting CO2 to reach a pH drop. Start with 1.0 then work your way down. Many tanks are more like 1.2 to 1.4 pH drop.
 
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