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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found my angel fish feasting on what I guess must be Sterbai Corey eggs last night. I have moved them en-mass in a breeder trap into my shrimp tank and just removed 20 or so much lighter opaque eggs which I understand are unfertilised.

Is anyone holding out hope for hatching/ survival with this set-up?

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My cories constantly lay eggs on my powerhead and I never get fry. On a whim, I took 6 and plopped them in a half land/half water tank on the other side of the house, gave my attention and figured it wouldn't work. Wouldn't you know it, I have 5 babies now.

So yes, there's a good chance if they were fertilized you'll have some fry.
 

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I was getting random egg drops from my CCs for nearly a year, but never any fries, until I swapped out the tank's HOB for a sponge filter. Now I have three (maybe more) little cats.

I guess the HOB was reducing their chances to 0%...
 

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Drop a shrimp or two in the breeder net with the cories and it will keep the eggs cleaned of anything growing on it, they will not hurt the eggs at all. If you can position the breeder net over a sponge filter flow it will up the survival rate was well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies.

I moved the breeding trap to half prop it over the water inlet as it felt a bit stagnant - the eggs are certainly getting lots of flow now!

Day 1 I removed about 20 'dead' yellow eggs. Day 2 there were about 8 more. This evening I went to remove the 5 or so more that had turned yellowish and I could see distinct movement coming from the good eggs - of which there must be over 50 left so fingers crossed!

There are three chilli rasboras in the tank so the fry will have to run the gauntlet of them, but with the current from the inlet and the fact the tank is so overgrown they stand a chance - certainly better than in the 260l community tank I rescued them from anyway!

Sam
 

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Yeah, as long as you separate them from the main tank they are pretty easy to get to hatch. I have about two dozen fry in a little .3 gallon attach on breeding box at the moment.

Don't go for the eggs as soon as they are laid, wait around an hour or so and you can just slide them off the glass and stick them on the side of the breeding box. Don't pay attention to color at this point, the eggs are white when first laid, it's normal. By the next day they should have darkened some. By the second day if they are still white it's safe to assume they either molded over or are not fertilized. As long as they keep darkening they are developing. Not much you can do at this point other than wait. Make sure to put them in a spot with water flow to prevent mold and yes shrimp will eat mold that starts to develop but leave the eggs themselves alone. (the live ones at least)

I can't judge without seeing, but I think those yellow eggs you are removing are live eggs. Mine get a little yellowish at first and transition to a dark beige. Any moving eggs might be from waterflow, mine never moved until they hatched. It typically takes up to 10 days for them to hatch.

Unless you are lucky enough to witness them hatching the eggs will pretty much just disappear. I've seen one hatch, and basically the egg will fall from the wall and start to shake. The tail comes out first and you will see what looks like a swimming egg. It will swim up for a second or two, stop completely and fall. It will do this on and off. They feed off what's left of the egg for the first 2-3 days and you don't need to feed them at this point.

You need to feed them high protein food when they are little. The best is freshly hatched or frozen baby brine shrimp. They are mostly transparent when little so you can tell they ate as you can see the food in their bellies. Fresh hatched will be pink while frozen is a brownish orange. Keep feeding them that until they start to get big and then you can start including things like finely ground flake food. If you have any moss in your tank put some in the breeding box as when they are little they will also eat the microorganisms that grow on it. It's also a good idea to put a shrimp or a snail in to help clean up anything left behind. If you use snails there is a chance they might eat any eggs in the breeder, but I've had mostly good luck with them.

I wouldn't put them back in the tank until they are about a 1/4 inch in size unless you just want to provide live food.
 

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Thanks.

I am sure I have it right - the whitish ones look like sesame seeds, the good ones are a golden orangey translucent colour.

The eggs are on a leaf I cut from the main tank and moved over. I lifted it clear of the water earlier to get the bad eggs off and there was deffinate movement. Looking closely now, the best way to describe it is that the eggs seem to have tails that franticly wave now and then!

Hope this comes out! 'Bad' egg in foreground, egg with tail in middle! Tail thrashes around every few seconds!

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The one in the front is a bad egg unless it was just laid. If the egg has a tail and it moving around it's already hatched. It will thrash around like that for up to two days and will use up what's left of the egg as food. If it just started I would start feeding them either Friday or Saturday.
 
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