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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's an example: Polycarbonate Tubeguard, Clear, for four foot T8 fluorescent tube, includes endcaps, FDA, OSHA and USDA approved http://www.goodmart.com/products/259185.htm

These tubeguards could be used in place of thicker glass aquarium covers to protect lights from splashing and moisture. I would think that the very thin polycarbonate tube walls would block a lot less light then glass aquarium covers, get less dirty then glass aquarium covers and be easier to wipe off then glass aquarium covers.

Does anyone know if they significantly block light output and/or affect light quality by blocking certain beneficial wavelengths that are important in photosynthesis? I would not think there would be any significant loss of light output or quality.
 

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Thickness has nothing to do with it. A thin sheet of lead will block a lot of light. A few atoms thickness of gold will do the same.

It's all in the transmission characteristics of the material in question.

I know I have seen that info but I'm too fuzzy minded to find it right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very good point Rex. As always, you offer a nice clear perspective (no pun intended). I'm hopeful that since polycarbonate is used to make most pairs of eyeglasses today, and that eyeglasses are expected to transmit a lot of light and are much thicker than the tubes, that they don't block much light or beneficial wavelengths. But I'd love to see the material if you can find it.
 

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Very good point Rex. As always, you offer a nice clear perspective (no pun intended). I'm hopeful that since polycarbonate is used to make most pairs of eyeglasses today, and that eyeglasses are expected to transmit a lot of light and are much thicker than the tubes, that they don't block much light or beneficial wavelengths. But I'd love to see the material if you can find it.
You must not wear glasses. :icon_wink
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As Rex pointed out, materials can have very different specific effects on which wavelenths they allow to pass and how much visible light they allow to pass. I'm very comfortable with the fact that most of the visible light will not be blocked, I just hope that beneficial photosynthetic wavelengths will not be blocked and would appreciate it very much if anyone has any information on this.

I have seen these tubes used by planted tank aquarists in Europe instead of glass tank covers.
 

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These tubeguards could be used in place of thicker glass aquarium covers to protect lights from splashing and moisture. I would think that the very thin polycarbonate tube walls would block a lot less light then glass aquarium covers, get less dirty then glass aquarium covers and be easier to wipe off then glass aquarium covers.
It is more important to protect the endcaps from splashing and moisture than the length of the bulb IMHO.
 
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