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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello
When you set up the DIY CO2 , should the airstone be on bottom of tank or it makes no difference as long as in tank?


Thanks
 

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Usually people put it at the bottom of the tank just because that way the bubbles have a longer chance to dissolve into your tank before reaching the top and releasing more CO2 into the atmosphere (wasted)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both very much. I am making the CO2 bottle now and was not sure of air line length but will now cut it so it reaches bottom of tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Try to place it near the intake of a filter or powerhead. The impeller will chop the bubbles into a mist, allowing them to dissolve more completely.

Thanks, my filter is an emperor with spray bar so not sure if that will remove the CO2 to fast, so as of now plan to just drop the airstone bottom of tank.

I put the bottle, etc together today and will start using it Tue as want to give the silicone glue a full 24 hours to harden.


I notice you fish for bass. We went last week by Glades for Peacock bass, caught several among other fish.
 

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okay dumb question why not just put the line into the intake and out the return (spray bar under water)?
 

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okay dumb question why not just put the line into the intake and out the return (spray bar under water)?
Some people do feed CO2 into the filter intake.

The problem with this (especially for canister filters) is that if there is sufficient CO2 being produced, then it could cause cavitation within the filter. But I doubt that DIY CO2 will generate enough CO2 to cause such problems.

For the filter return (the spray bar output), you want it to be below the surface of the water so that excessive surface agitation does not occur. However, at the same time, you want there to be some surface movement (soft rippling).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
okay dumb question why not just put the line into the intake and out the return (spray bar under water)?

Yes ,that would be what I would do but wiuth this particular filter the spray bar must be above water and it sprays the water down so if I pumped in the CO2 via the intake tube I would lose the CO2 as the water splashed .
 

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me hijacking the thread. what is a good rate for DIY CO2? Mine feeds bubbles into the pump intake. for the first few days I had a million tiny bubbles in my tank. now I have plenty but it's not really noticible unless I'm right in front of the tank.

If I remove the airline tubing from the pump to count bubbles what would be a good number per minute?
 

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me hijacking the thread. what is a good rate for DIY CO2? Mine feeds bubbles into the pump intake. for the first few days I had a million tiny bubbles in my tank. now I have plenty but it's not really noticible unless I'm right in front of the tank.

If I remove the airline tubing from the pump to count bubbles what would be a good number per minute?

mine is CRAZY high for 6 gallon... almost killed my shrimps... so now i do like 1 hr in the am that's all... i'm getting like 4 bubbles per second.. NO idea how to slow it down!
 

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Ways to slow the flow from yeast based CO2:

Cool it off.
I kept mine on top of the light. When the light came on it warmed the bottle. Lights out, bottle cooled off.

Raise the bubbler. Put it where the CO2 will sheet across the surface. This is wasting some, but better than killing the livestock. When the peak of production is over then move the bubbler to take advantage of the reduced CO2 and not lose any.

Use less yeast. It will grow more slowly, and perhaps start to kill itself in toxins before the population gets so high as to cause problems.

Use Jell-O as the sugar source. Slows down the process.
 

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thanks !!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ways to slow the flow from yeast based CO2:

Cool it off.
I kept mine on top of the light. When the light came on it warmed the bottle. Lights out, bottle cooled off.

Raise the bubbler. Put it where the CO2 will sheet across the surface. This is wasting some, but better than killing the livestock. When the peak of production is over then move the bubbler to take advantage of the reduced CO2 and not lose any.

Use less yeast. It will grow more slowly, and perhaps start to kill itself in toxins before the population gets so high as to cause problems.

Use Jell-O as the sugar source. Slows down the process.
"Use Jell-O as the sugar source. Slows down the process"

Interesting thanks
 
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