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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I buy a fair bit of seachem iron for my tanks and it can get pretty expensive. What are the components of chelated iron? Iron sulfate? Iron (III) chloride?

What could I use to make up my own mixture?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I work in a lab so I have access to many different chemicals. I am just wondering what form the chelated iron comes in?
 

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I would just buy a bag from Greg Watson and get it over with... I dont mean to insult your knowledge with chemistry JRS but I think that it would be wiser not to make your own plant nutrients in your lab. Just my opinion.
 

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I believe there has been a discussion in the past that Seachem uses some form of chelated iron that is taken up easier by the plant than some of the other ETDA-iron offerings. It is expensive, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
2 litres in Canada is $46.99 :mad: Now do you see why I am looking for a cheaper alternative
 

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you can buy 2 liters of it for 22 bucks at dr foster smith....I would hope 2 liters should last quite some time.
You can make 2.3 Liters for $8.99 + shipping (half pound) if you buy the dry stuff from Greg Watson.

Edit: Rex, you beat me to it! Its true, you can make about 4.5 liters with 1 pound.
 

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Seachem stuff is stabilized by utilizing gluconate and not artificial chelator (EDTA and the likes) based.
The process involves heating with boiler and a series of metodological mixing. I'd say it is not that easy to make, moreover most of the time you are required to buy a big bulk of materials when you need just a few pounds (or even a few grams).

I speak from a manufacturer-to-be side... making chealted iron that stays stable and has the correct formula to maintain aestetical aspects on aquarium use is not that easy and may take some time of formulating, experimenting and a lenghty testing on controlled subjects. There are individual "working range" for each chelating agent and the nature of whatever raw material you are using is important as well to match that.
I consider myself lucky enough that I've been able to create my own chelated iron-trace mix. Sheer luck indeed to do it in a short time without a team of scientist.

I'd say at the other side of the world you still can get those advanced iron chelate for cheap (esp get some from bulk one from GW). We have to pay almost US$ 20 just to get 250mL of TMG, and that is not so easily since these products are not well distributed.
 
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